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ShortTakes:The Hunter

Review: The Hunter

Apparently extinct since the 1930s, the Tasmanian Tiger resembled an uncanny assortment of mismatched parts from other animals. Daniel Nettheim's film is equally weird and motley.
Weird and motley
By PETER KEOUGH  |  May 18, 2012
Review: Tyrannosaur

Review: Tyrannosaur(1)

In his directorial debut, actor Paddy Considine has learned that the best way to develop sympathy for someone who kicks his dog to death is by comparing him to another character (Eddie Marsan) who urinates on his wife.
Paddy Considine's directorial debut
By PETER KEOUGH  |  February 24, 2012
Review: Bullhead

Review: Bullhead(1)

What this cattle farmer at the center of talented writer/director Michael R. Roskam's debut feature – Belgium's foreign-language Oscar nominee – lacks, he tries to make up for with steroids.
Michael R. Roskam's debut feature
By BRETT MICHEL  |  February 24, 2012
Review: Battle Royale

Review: Battle Royale (2000)

In a not-so-distant future society that has devolved into chaos, Japan's youth run amok, Clockwork Orange –style, and the government has passed an act decreeing that one unruly grade-school class will face off in a battle from which only one will emerg
A not-so-distant future society
By ALEXANDRA CAVALLO  |  February 24, 2012
Review Addiction Inc

Review: Addiction Incorporated

Much of the first half of Charles Evans Jr.'s muckraking documentary is annoyingly gimmicky, relying on unneeded graphics, animation, and imitation-Errol-Morris effects to tell the tale of a Philip Morris scientist, Victor DeNoble, who became a key gove
Charles Evans Jr.'s muckraking documentary
By GERALD PEARY  |  February 24, 2012
The Divide review

Review: The Divide

Many a teleplay for The Twilight Zone threatened atomic Armageddon, and though Frontier(s) director Xavier Gens nukes New York in the opening shots of his latest thriller, he finds more inspiration in the horrors of human nature as seen in the old T
The horrors of human nature
By BRETT MICHEL  |  January 13, 2012


Inside Hana's Suitcase - Short Take

Review: Inside Hana's Suitcase

When Fumiko Ishioka, the director of the Holocaust Education Centre in Tokyo, is given charge of a child's suitcase found in the rubble of Auschwitz — a rarity, as most such belongings were lost — it piques her interest. She and her students decide to f
Larry Weinstein's stirring documentary
By ALEXANDRA CAVALLO  |  November 11, 2011
Short Take Melancholia

Review: Melancholia

Here's what we learn from Melancholia : life sucks, people are awful, we're all going to die, and good riddance. Who says Lars von Trier doesn't like happy endings?
Who says Lars von Trier doesn't like happy endings?
By PETER KEOUGH  |  November 11, 2011
Weekend short take 3

Review: Weekend

This appealing gay-themed drama, written and directed with intelligence by Andrew Haigh, is a British cousin to the American mumblecore movement, as two twentysomething guys meet, have sex, talk, have more sex, have much more chat, and get closer and cl
Gay-themed drama
By GERALD PEARY  |  October 14, 2011
love crime 3

Review: Love Crime

Love Crime deconstructs the genre by showing how to put together a mystery in order to deceive and manipulate those who would try to take it apart.
A deconstruction of the mystery genre
By PETER KEOUGH  |  October 07, 2011
short take Girlfriend

Review: Girlfriend

One night Evan's mother (Amanda Plummer) asks him to make a wish. He says he wants a girlfriend, and his wish comes true, but at a cost.
Concerned only with the truth
By PETER KEOUGH  |  September 30, 2011


Jonah Hill - Back Talk

Jonah Hill straightens up

The Superbad star has embraced his inner math geek for his role in Moneyball, the film adaptation of Michael Lewis's best-selling book on Oakland A's general manager Billy Beane, who turned the baseball world on its head in 2002 when he cast aside his sc
Money man
By SEAN KERRIGAN  |  September 23, 2011
My Afternoons with...

Review: My Afternoons with Margueritte

European cinema doesn't have as many sure-fire formulas as Hollywood, but the one described, I think, by Pauline Kael as the "lonely child, clean old man" scenario has long endured.
Twisting the "lonely child, clean old man" formula
By PETER KEOUGH  |  September 23, 2011
Lisbon Mysteries

Review: Mysteries of Lisbon

Ruiz's gorgeous, painterly visuals are shot from startling angles and work alongside his precise, anarchic, and gleefully absurd narrative to evoke a heightened reality that plumbs the mysteries of life.
Raúl Ruiz's legacy
By PETER KEOUGH  |  August 26, 2011
Griff the Invisible 3

Review: Griff the Invisible

Like Kick-Ass and Super , Leon Ford's Griff the Invisible reaffirms the notion that superheroes exist to provide the meek and marginalized with an empowering fantasy.
Downtrodden superheroes
By PETER KEOUGH  |  August 26, 2011
brighton rock 3

Review: Brighton Rock

For Graham Greene, the Catholic Church served more as a scourge than a comfort, but in Rowan Joffe's dreary, incoherent adaptation of Greene's 1939 novel, it merely offers an excuse to add choirs to the soundtrack.
Rowan Joffe's adaptation of Graham Greene's 1939 novel
By PETER KEOUGH  |  August 26, 2011


senna 3

Review: Senna

The story of Brazilian Formula One champion Ayrton Senna sounds, well, just like a movie — Le Mans , maybe, or Talladega Nights without the comedy.
Chronicling Ayrton Senna's career
By PETER KEOUGH  |  August 19, 2011
ancient romans 3

Sun Araw | Ancient Romans

The hypnotic fifth LP by Sun Araw — the five-year-old solo project of Angelino Cameron Stallones — is a double-vinyl spiral through deep zones of neo-primitive psych-drone noise.
Sun Ark/Drag City (2011)
By LIZ PELLY  |  August 19, 2011
robinwood 3

Review: Robinwood Café & Grille

The diner — that hallowed bastion of old-time Americana, the predecessor to modern fast-food joints — is simply not one of our long suits. In this relatively weak field, Robinwood Café & Grille, a Jamaica Plain diner, executes solidly on the standby
Executing solidly in the classic New England Greek-American diner tradition
By MC SLIM JB  |  August 19, 2011
names of love 3

Review: The Names of Love

Child abuse, genocide — those French have a way with romantic comedies.
Softcore sex and politics
By PETER KEOUGH  |  August 19, 2011
Live forever 3

Review: How to Live Forever

Take the most depressing movie imaginable, add The Golden Girls , multiply by Cocoon , and that's How To Live Forever .
Wexler mocks the "anti-aging marketplace"
By CHRIS FARAONE  |  August 19, 2011


chinese food red lantern

Review: Red Lantern

Red Lantern's menu (and the design of the giant room) hedges its bets — there's a decent sushi bar, a drinking bar with sports on the TVs, a flurry of hot-pot tables, and some serious steaks.
Nostalgic fusion with so much for so many
By ROBERT NADEAU  |  August 12, 2011
taste persia 2

Review: Jasmine Taste of Persia

Boston is fortunate to boast a number of worthy budget-priced Persian restaurants, among which Jasmine Taste of Persia, located in a stretch of Watertown thick with indie restaurants and Armenian bakeries/grocers, has to rate highly.
A winning introduction to an underrated cuisine
By MC SLIM JB  |  August 05, 2011
dining Floating Rock

Review: Floating Rock

If summer brings an urge for spicy Asian food, this is a splendid place to get some, despite a few chili-pepper compromises.
Spicy Asian that rises above the rest
By ROBERT NADEAU  |  July 29, 2011
comfort food from Fill Bellys

Review: Fill Belly's

As the wheels of the food truck turn, so does the cyclical nature of trends. Fill Belly's latest spin is a retro one: a brick-and-mortar storefront.
A JP comfort-food spot that's been around the block
By LINDSAY CRUDELE  |  July 29, 2011
Tamarind House -- thai food

Review: Tamarind House

Tamarind House perhaps shows too restrained a hand with its cuisine's boldest flavors, but it's a useful step up from the bowdlerized meekness of the suburban Thai run-of-the-mill.
A gentle step down from our fiercest traditional Thai restaurants
By MC SLIM JB  |  July 22, 2011