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William Blake

Latest Articles

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Mission accomplished

After 13 years, singer/guitarist Aaron Turner and the band (all New England kids except Ohio native Meyer) have announced that they're packing it in.
Isis call it quits with a last-hurrah tour
By MATT PARISH  |  June 18, 2010
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Blake babies

Nature is mysterious and mystical in "And the fair Moon rejoices" (at the BCA's Mills Gallery through August 16), as foreign as the wilds of New England probably seemed to its first English settlers. And maybe there are witches about.
New visions at the BCA and the ICA
By GREG COOK  |  August 07, 2009
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Review: Brüno

Candide camera
Sacha Baron Cohen's Brüno restores bad taste to its rightful place
By A.S. HAMRAH  |  July 10, 2009
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States of the art

In New England, where you can't swing a sack of cranberries without hitting a venerable cultural institution, anyone with access to a car (or even a subway pass) can scope out these topnotch art museums.
New England museums worth traveling for
By SHAULA CLARK  |  June 12, 2009
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Three's company

The show's American curator, Frederick Ilchman, has snagged an improbable number of pairs and trios from the world's famous (and not so famous) museums.
Titian, Tintoretto, and Veronese rule at the MFA
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  March 11, 2009
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Interview: Alan Moore, writer of Watchmen

The winner of several "Best Comics Writer" awards on both sides of the Atlantic, he's best known in America as the author of the DC Comics series Swamp Thing and, of course, Watchmen.
From the Boston Phoenix archives: the watchmaker speaks.
By M. HOWELL  |  March 04, 2009


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Will Harvard drop acid again?

In a moment of delightful whimsy in the annals of drug history, Albert Hofmann, after purposely ingesting LSD for the first time, rode his bicycle home and experienced all manner of beatific and hellish visions.
Psychedelic research returns to Crimsonland
By PETER BEBERGAL  |  May 28, 2008
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Revolution (age) 9

Brookline Music School Takes On “The White Album”
Brookline Music School at Northeastern's Blackman Theatre, May 11
By JAMES PARKER  |  May 14, 2008
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The marriage of Heaven and Hell

It’s been a joy to see James Levine back on the Symphony Hall podium, with his admirable combination of vitality and sensitivity.
Levine’s Schubert and Bolcom, Boston Baroque’s King Arthur, Jan Curtis
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  March 07, 2008
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Mutiny in Heaven

It is a truth now well established that the idea for a series of books about a schoolboy wizard did not , in fact, originate with its author, J.K. Rowling (as she has naively claimed), but was piped up red-hot and stinking from Below.
Philip Pullman ’ s fantasy novels are condemned as a crash course in militant atheism. But one BU professor thinks otherwise.
By JAMES PARKER  |  December 06, 2007
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Agent Zimmerman

I had just removed his hand — gently, I hope — from my knee when the man in the off-white linen suit told me that he was the one who recruited Bob Dylan into the CIA.
Bob Dylan? A CIA spy? Wait . . . now it all makes sense. (Or as much sense as his lyrics make, anyway.)
By JAMES PARKER  |  November 20, 2007


Chronicle of a death foretold

What a difference a death makes.
Joy Division were rooted in grim finality. Now, through a series of new books, CDs, and films, the band has found new life.
By JAMES PARKER  |  October 24, 2007
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Greatest reality hits

To be read while listening to Green Day’s “Time of Your Life” or Mary Hopkin’s “Those Were The Days, My Friend."
The 10 best moments of the past nine months or so
By JAMES PARKER  |  July 03, 2007
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Breast friends

When it comes to reality TV, the Brits operate with a pungent, hot-button immediacy that America’s producer tribe must envy.
Stalking Pete Doherty and The Girls Next Door exact their pound of flesh
By JAMES PARKER  |  March 10, 2007
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London falling

Damon Albarn — Blur frontman, Gorillaz supremo, and now millennial minstrel to the drowning city of London — is that eerie modern specimen, the pop star who talks like a critic. The Good, The Bad, and the Queen, "Kingdom of Doom" (streaming video)
Damon Albarn’s The Good, the Bad & the Queen
By JAMES PARKER  |  February 21, 2007

The Stones

This article originally appeared in the August 26, 1994 issue of the Boston Phoenix.
An essay on the older
By CAMILLE PAGLIA  |  November 16, 2006


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Nice shot

No home run in baseball history is as famous as Bobby Thomson’s “shot heard round the world.”
Joshua Prager revisits the home run
By WILLIAM CORBETT  |  October 24, 2006
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Cheap thrills

Summertime inevitably raises the question: what are we going to do with our crazy, hot selves? Summer Guide 2006: Cheap thrills from Bar Harbor to New Haven.
Paw Sox, Penny Slots, and Ponies — so cheap, it might cost you
By ELLEE DEAN  |  June 14, 2006
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Manchester calling

Known as “Cottonopolis,” the “shock city” of the 19th century, Victorian-era Manchester, as Tristram Hunt demonstrates in this architectural/sociological saga, was a modern-day Babylon of sorts — or worse if you happened to be living there at the time.
In the shadow of the first industrial cities
By COLIN FLEMING  |  May 23, 2006
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Us, writ large

Mark Morris’s L’Allegro, il Penseroso ed il Moderato is a dance as big as its name, as big as its illustrious associates and enablers, George Frideric Handel, John Milton, William Blake, and a contemporary galaxy of dancers, musicians, and designers.
Mark Morris’s L’Allegro
By MARCIA B. SIEGEL  |  January 24, 2006