Willem de Kooning

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Abstract-Expressionist New England

"American Vanguards" at the Addison Gallery tells how a tiny group of New York friends — Stuart Davis, John Graham, Arshile Gorky, Willem de Kooning "and their circle" — inspired by Picasso and Surrealism, exploded the last ties between Modernist painti

By GREG COOK  |  December 14, 2012

Richard Brown Lethem finds new playing fields

"One thing that's different about this show," Richard Brown Lethem tells me as we stand in the gallery where his paintings currently hang, "is that I'd never done a series before now. I've always tried to fit all the subject matter into one painting."
Content with the unknown
By NICHOLAS SCHROEDER  |  August 19, 2011

Review: Philip Guston: Collected Writings, Lectures, And Conversations

If you are interested in the great painter Philip Guston (1913–1980), you will want this book. If you are interested in American painting from 1945 on, and into the future, you will want this book. If you enjoy a great talker in top form, you will want
Fast talk: A great artist bends your ear
By WILLIAM CORBETT  |  January 07, 2011

Alternative universe

In the 1930s and '40s, Boston painters developed a moody, mythic realism. They mixed social satire with depictions of street scenes, Biblical scenes, and mystical symbolic narratives, all of it darkened by the shadow of the Great Depression and World W
Boston Expressionism in context
By GREG COOK  |  December 18, 2009

Wizards and masterpieces

At “Harry Potter: The Exhibition” at the Museum of Science, when a robed attendant places the sorting hat on a visitor’s head and soon after a door whooshes open to reveal the Hogwarts Express, you find yourself filled with the kind of giddy expectation
Harry Potter at the Museum of Science, and another look at the Rose
By GREG COOK  |  November 06, 2009

Slideshow: Final moments at the Rose?

Photos from what could be the final days at the Rose Art Museum

By JOEL VEAK  |  May 15, 2009


Will Brandeis sell out the Rose?

Will Brandeis take the money and run?
As the clock ticks down, the world-renowned museum confronts the art of survival
By GREG COOK  |  May 15, 2009

Will Brandeis lose its swagger?

Ethnomusicologically invigorated Brandeis students and alumni are hoping for an outburst of criticism for the probable downsizing of Wayne Marshall.
Pass the Hat . . . Again
By CHRIS FARAONE  |  April 01, 2009


Jamaica Plain's Laurel Sparks has become one of our best local abstract painters, as her new collection of bright, fun, juicy, abstracted chandeliers at Howard Yezerski Gallery attests.
Laurel Sparks at Yezerski, plus Julie Miller, Sheila Gallagher, Darren Foote, and Michael Ellis
By GREG COOK  |  February 20, 2009

The thinker at mid century

A long time ago (say 70 years), in a galaxy far, far away (New York), a tired band of rebels ached to be the Next Big Thing.
Size matters
By GREG COOK  |  January 27, 2009

Let me see your grill

If there’s one thing the new horror flick Teeth teaches us, it’s that nothing sours a romantic soirée like a vagina dentata.
The origins of the vagina dentata
By GREG COOK  |  January 25, 2008


Natural selections

The gorilla is a black blur, out of nowhere, barreling into the cage door — clang! — and then zooming off through the fake rocks and trees.
Gorilla-made paintings at Franklin Park Zoo
By GREG COOK  |  August 14, 2007

Ah, painting!

“Big Bang! Abstract Painting for the 21st Century” rounds up 15 painters who reinvigorate abstraction by drawing inspiration and imagery from computers, stars and constellations, quantum physics, data mapping, the Internet, genetics, squiggly microscopic
At the DeCordova, abstraction is new again
By GREG COOK  |  January 29, 2007

Fight the power

Art mixes it up with history and politics, peers closely at electronic surveillance, worries about its own usefulness, traipses down the fashion runway, and brings cool stuff back from China and Puerto Rico in exhibitions opening this fall.
Artists protest war, scrutinize surveillance, explore usefulness, and embrace couture  
By RANDI HOPKINS  |  September 13, 2006

Variations and themes

The technique of the artist isn’t usually the first thing that comes to mind when you see a work — at least not a successful one.
“Webs, Loops, and Skeins” at the RISD Museum  
By BILL RODRIGUEZ  |  March 14, 2006