Latest Articles


Saco star: Luis’s phenomenal arepas

You might want to hug Luis, or at least flirt with the guy, because he is creating first-rate arepas in his charming little shop.
Delicious inside and out
By BRIAN DUFF  |  March 22, 2013

The Year in Monkey News

Simian news items, compiled for your reading pleasure.
Primate dispatches from around the globe

Review: South of the Border

Oliver Stone may have been easy on W. in his bio-pic, but he chops the dummy's head off in this revealing documentary about the social-welfare-minded neo-liberal leaders running South America, and the liars in the Bush administration who compared them
Oliver Stone's look at Hugo Chavéz, among others
By CHRIS FARAONE  |  October 01, 2010

All you need is love

Outpourings of love have been flooding the Boston musical scene.
Marylou Speaker Churchill memorial, Emmanuel Music’s Haydn/Schoenberg, and more
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  April 23, 2010

Department of conjecture

The Haiti disaster will not serve to turn a state from toss-up to safely Republican as the George W. Bush Administration's calculated response to Hurricane Katrina did in Louisiana.
Letters to the Portland Editor, January 29, 2010
By PORTLAND PHOENIX LETTERS  |  January 29, 2010

Review: Araya

Margot Benacerraf's extraordinary Venezuelan documentary, among the finest ever made, shared the 1959 International Critics Prize at Cannes with Alain Resnais's Hiroshima, mon amour and then disappeared.
Benacerraf's classic documentary gets an anniversary showing
By GERALD PEARY  |  December 18, 2009


Tilting at Windows

Stallman — a legend in the programmer community for more than a quarter century — considers it his life's work to proselytize the free-software gospel, educating the lay people who'd otherwise assume that Microsoft or Apple are exclusively synonymous wit
Software 'Saint' Richard Stallman fights for computing freedom — and against corporate control
By MIKE MILIARD  |  December 18, 2009
mind the gap list

Structural integrity

The five artists featured in "Stratum," now on view at Whitney Art Works, are diverse in background, medium, and scale, but they comfortably crowd the gallery's two rooms with sculptures, paintings, and drawings that respond to the relationships exposed
A group show at the Whitney
By ANNIE LARMON  |  May 29, 2009

Review: Up

Nobody these days tells stories as cinematically as do the people at Pixar. At least for the first half-hour of their films.
Raising the art to a higher level
By PETER KEOUGH  |  May 29, 2009

Video vérité

Javier Téllez's 2007 black-and-white film "Letter on the Blind, For the Use of Those Who See" starts with a catchy premise: he gathered six blind New Yorkers at an empty public pool in Brooklyn to act out the fable of the blind men and the elephant.
'Acting Out' at the ICA, plus Eileen Quinlan
By GREG COOK  |  April 03, 2009

Crossword: '''Tis the season''

For once, I hope you don't catch on
By MATT JONES  |  November 05, 2008


Troop surge

It’s tempting to write off Mercenaries 2: World in Flames , if only because of the noisy ads — they’re scored by an annoying white-boy rap song.
Mercenaries 2 does it the old-fashioned way
By AARON SOLOMON  |  September 16, 2008

Letter from London

How could you not fall in love with this city?
The foggy joys of Europe’s most international city
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  September 05, 2008

One mean mother

As the old expression goes, “If it’s not one thing, it’s your mother.”
Fox’s theorem: Back renewable energy or get bent
By PHILLIPE AND JORGE  |  June 11, 2008


So what’s all the excitement about?
Definitely worth the wait
By ROBERT NADEAU  |  June 11, 2008

Study this

Politics and other mistakes
Politics and other mistakes
By AL DIAMON  |  May 21, 2008

Building better bodyguards

This article originally ran in the May 2, 1978 issue of the Boston Phoenix .

Inside a Connecticutt "anti-terrorist driving school"

By MICHAEL MATZA  |  May 01, 2008

Travel green

Since my arrival to Maine in the past year, I have been more than amply informed about the green energy crisis.
Letters to the Portland editor: February 22, 2008
By LETTER TO THE PORTLAND EDITOR  |  February 20, 2008

From Mangoland to Portland

It’s a particularly wonderful experience to eat Venezuelan food in the middle of a sleet storm in Maine.
Venezuelan arepas bring the tropics to Sleetville
By LINDSAY STERLING  |  February 13, 2008

Everyone’s a neocon now

In the eight years I’ve covered the State House for the Portland Phoenix, I’ve been struck by the depressingly constant themes.
Looking back on state politics — and forward
By LANCE TAPLEY  |  December 21, 2007

Temporarily north of the border

Add another name to the list of Phoenix alums (Mark Leibovich, Dave Crowley, Seth Gitell, Dan Kennedy) writing on the 2008 presidential race.
Al Giordano plays the Field
By ADAM REILLY  |  December 19, 2007


Linked cuisine

A year ago the Portland online food community was stuck in the Golden age.
Portland's food scene steps online
By BRIAN DUFF  |  December 19, 2007

The dictator slayer

According to some people — including at least one sitting head of state — East Boston’s Gene Sharp is a dangerous dude.
East Boston's Gene Sharp is soft-spoken, but he makes bad guys from Caracas to Beijing cringe
By ADAM REILLY  |  December 05, 2007

Super abundance

“Something absolutely extraordinary is happening in Venezuela,” announced Tony Woodcock.
Gustavo Dudamel and the Simón Bolívar Youth Orchestra of Venezuela; James Levine’s Berg and Mahler; Measha Brueggergosman at Jordan Hall
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  November 13, 2007

The hottest and brightest

The New England Conservatory is bringing to Symphony Hall the hottest of young conductors.
Rescued by music
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  November 01, 2007


In Carolee Schneemann's 1975 performance Interior Scroll, she stood naked and read about sexism from a three-foot-long strip of paper that she pulled out of her vagina.
Naked ladies, bearded ladies, naked dolls, and more
By GREG COOK  |  October 23, 2007


The dirty story behind local energy

It’s hard to imagine that a town as poor as this one could have a slum.
Eastern Massachusetts hums comfortably on Colombian coal. But the mines are devastating land and lives in the Guajira peninsula.
By AVIVA CHOMSKY  |  October 01, 2007

Internet disconnect

If only our state officials thought about fiber.
Getting online in Maine can be painfully slow. And the planned Verizon-FairPoint merger won’t help.
By JEFF INGLIS  |  August 22, 2007

The last Potter

The end is never easy, is it?
What does the end mean for Harry’s strange Boston disciples?
By SHARON STEEL  |  July 24, 2007

Rushdie’s courage

Bombay-born Salman Rushdie, educated at Rugby and Cambridge, is now Sir Salman Rushdie.
Why Sir Salman’s knighthood matters
By EDITORIAL  |  June 20, 2007