U.S. Department of State

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Freedom Watch: Speak no evil

It wasn’t the first time members of the Congressional Black Caucus had heard – and done nothing about – Sudan’s dirty secret. Even before a recent House international-relations subcommittee hearing on human-rights violations in Sudan, they knew that kid
Why are African-American leaders silent about slavery in Sudan?
By TIM SANDLER  |  May 21, 2010

Culture and choreography

Not only is the FirstWorks organization devoted to presenting “first-time-in-Rhode Island” performances throughout their seven-week fall festival (through November 15), but the staff is also always seeking diversity of cultures, media, and experiences.
Horse and Yellow Bird Dancers at FirstWorks
By JOHNETTE RODRIGUEZ  |  October 16, 2009

Shooting from the lip

Washington – Edward M. Kennedy's presidential campaign has a serious problem, and the problem appears to be Edward M. Kennedy. During the week in which leadership was transformed from a word in the lexicon of his campaign rhetoric to a measurable realit
Kennedy's gaffe on Iran manages to make a bad image worse
By MARCO TRBOVICH  |  August 28, 2009

Battle of the banned

It's one thing to be a musician and get thrown out of Disneyland (Velvet Underground) or banned from a national landmark (Ozzy Osbourne at the Alamo), but you've hit rock paydirt when you become the target of an entire nation.
Authorities kick out the jams
By DANIEL BROCKMAN  |  March 02, 2009

She's back - almost

Why Clinton's appointment is good for Obama. Plus, better Boston graduates.
Why Clinton's appointment is good for Obama. Plus, better Boston graduates.
By EDITORIAL  |  November 19, 2008


Playwright Deborah Brevoort looked at the 1988 Pan Am Flight 103 bombing, shook her head, and reduced the tragedy to its effect on one family and one town in The Women of Lockerbie , being staged by Roger Williams University Theatre (through November 2
Lockerbie overdoes the melodrama
By BILL RODRIGUEZ  |  November 19, 2008


Mao's ghost

When the 21st century is old enough to support a sense of historical perspective, the date 8/8/08 may well be more significant than 9/11.
The spirit of the chairman haunts the Beijing Olympics
By EDITORIAL  |  August 06, 2008

Immigrant song

You, my young British friend, start a band.
How US terror policy is ruining your summer concert season
By JASON O'BRYAN  |  June 18, 2008

Intelligence deficit

The American press and public rarely get riled up these days over new revelations concerning President George W. Bush and his administration’s sorry history.
Bush fooled voters and the press once on Iraq. Can McCain get away with the same thing?
By EDITORIAL  |  June 11, 2008

Building better bodyguards

This article originally ran in the May 2, 1978 issue of the Boston Phoenix .

Inside a Connecticutt "anti-terrorist driving school"

By MICHAEL MATZA  |  May 01, 2008

What about Tibet?

It is about money.
The Olympics may prove to be China’s Achilles’s heel
By EDITORIAL  |  March 28, 2008


On the national affront

Where does one begin to recap 12 months of such willful self-parody?
An inescapable year reaches its inevitable conclusion
By BARRY CRIMMINS  |  December 19, 2007

A tragicomedy of errors

It was not until after George W. Bush and Dick Cheney were narrowly re-elected that many Americans began to realize that the Iraq War represented a dangerous moment in American history.
In an excerpt from his new book, The Fall of the House of Bush, author Craig Unger details how Bush is, well, screwing up the world
By CRAIG UNGER  |  November 20, 2007

Rudy's mayor problem

The biggest threat to Giuliani’s campaign can be summed up in two words: Michael Bloomberg.
Giuliani’s campaign-trail fortune could lay in the hands of New York City’s pesky other Hizzoner, Michael Bloomberg
By STEVEN STARK  |  August 08, 2007

Letter to the Portland editor: July 13, 2007

The reason conservatives don’t want everyone to get a passport is that they don’t want Americans to go overseas.
Real ID is here

The 10th Annual Muzzle Awards

Mitt Romney will say or do anything if he thinks it will help him become president.
Silencing free speech
By DAN KENNEDY  |  July 10, 2007


Annals of termination

George W. Bush is guilty of a lot of things. But in her just-released book, former federal prosecutor Elizabeth de la Vega gets specific.
Yet another mission to accomplish
By MIKE MILIARD  |  May 02, 2007

The song remains the same

At one point early on in last weekend’s anti-war rally in Washington, DC, a speaker instructed the crowd, which was facing en masse toward the Capitol Building, to turn around and look in the other direction — toward the White House, the State Department
Did last weekend’s march on Washington mark a new surge in street activism or the waning of an old-school protest style?
By DEIRDRE FULTON  |  January 31, 2007

Major and minor Billy

Billy Wilder’s expansive career began in Germany at the end of the ’20s, continued briefly in Paris when he fled Hitler in 1933, and picked up in Hollywood the following year.
The HFA celebrates Wilder’s centennial
By STEVE VINEBERG  |  December 07, 2006

Flashbacks: November 24, 2006

These selections, culled from our back files, were compiled by Dan Peleschuk, Ian Sands, and Eva Wolchover.
The Boston Phoenix has been covering the trends and events that shape our times since 1966.
By FLASHBACKS  |  November 21, 2006

A force for change

Arriving in 1988 as the corrupt misdeeds of then-Governor Edward DiPrete were bursting into public view, H. Philip West Jr. picked an opportune time to take the helm of Common Cause of Rhode Island.
Phil West bids farewell after an eventful 18 years at common cause
By IAN DONNIS  |  November 21, 2006


Stripped bare

Lainie has stripped one room in her house of art, furniture, carpets, and even paint.
Cell + home + spirits in Two Rooms
By MEGAN GRUMBLING  |  November 15, 2006

Africa's invisible slaves

This article originally appeared in the June 30, 1995 issue of the Boston Phoenix.
Human bondage resurfaces in the dark heart of Sudan
By TIM SANDLER  |  November 14, 2006

Satire versus spoof

The American media have long pigged out on titillation and tragedy. And in After Ashley , Gina Gionfriddo has written a frighteningly funny work about that particular eating disorder.
Gina Gionfriddo’s After Ashley ; A.R. Gurney’s Screen Play
By CAROLYN CLAY  |  November 08, 2006

An empty gesture

Boston mayor Thomas Menino’s plan for a panel of three civilians to review complaints about the police is vintage Menino. And that, sad to say, is not a compliment.
Why Menino’s police reform is a bad joke
By EDITORIAL  |  September 05, 2006

Flashbacks: July 7, 2006

These selections, culled from our back files, were compiled by Doug Fleischer, Sam MacLaughlin, and Hannah Van-Susteren.
The Boston Phoenix has been covering the trends and events that shape our times since 1966
By EDITORIAL  |  July 05, 2006


Breslin turns bard

Jimmy Breslin, Pulitzer-winning columnist and author, has turned playwright.
The columnist’s play goes up on the Cape
By IRIS FANGER  |  July 05, 2006

Graham Greene’s last interview

This article originally appeared in the June 28, 1991 issue of the Boston Phoenix .
A great writer condemns US interventionism
By JOHN R. MACARTHUR  |  June 28, 2006

Won’t get fooled again

Seymour Hersh’s April 17 New Yorker article, which reported that a “messianic” Bush White House was contemplating regime change and tactical nuclear strikes to pre-empt Iran’s bomb-building program, landed with its own explosive power last week.
With reports of Iran-war drums beating, how will the media react this time around?  
By MARK JURKOWITZ  |  April 25, 2006

Opera’s great loss

When the curtain went up at Boston’s Back Bay Theatre for the American premiere of Arnold Schoenberg’s Moses und Aron , in November 1966, two figures were standing back to back in a spotlight on a small disc.
Sarah Caldwell, 1924–2006
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  March 29, 2006