Suzan Lori Parks

Latest Articles


A racial duet at Dramatic Rep

Their father meant nothing particularly serious when he named his sons, African-American like himself, Lincoln and Booth — in fact, Booth tells his little brother, the names were kind of a joke.
Brothers in arms
By MEGAN GRUMBLING  |  November 02, 2012

Fall Theater Preview: Fall on Boston boards

Fall came early to Boston boards this year, bringing with it "Summertime."
Stage worthies
By CAROLYN CLAY  |  September 16, 2011

I loves you, Porgy

So shoot me, Porgy purists. To my mind, the retooling of The Gershwins' Porgy and Bess for American Repertory Theater is compelling enough to push past quibbles.
The A.R.T. streamlines a classic
By CAROLYN CLAY  |  September 02, 2011
ART takes on Porgy and Bess 2

Reimagining Porgy and Bess

In the new production at the American Repertory Theater, directed by Diane Paulus, Messrs. Heyward and Gershwin have been reworked by two actual African-Americans: two-time Obie Award winner Diedre L. Murray and Suzan-Lori Parks, the first African-Americ
The A.R.T. takes on the Gershwins' classic and prep it for Broadway
By EUGENIA WILLIAMSON  |  August 12, 2011
GRACE list

Company One's Book of Grace

America, from sink to shining sink: that's the real subject of Suzan-Lori Parks's domestic explosion, The Book of Grace.  
America play
By CAROLYN CLAY  |  April 29, 2011

Call of the cash

Naming The Merchant of Venice after Antonio is like naming Medea after Jason.
The Merchant of Venice ; Voyeurs de Venus ; The Oil Thief
By CAROLYN CLAY  |  November 11, 2008


Killing grounds

Chekhov wrote to a friend while composing The Seagull , first of his Big Four, that he was writing a “comedy with three female parts, six male parts, four acts, a landscape (a view of the lake), much talk about literature, and five tons of love.”
The Seagull flies at the Publick; Company One knocks off Assassins
By CAROLYN CLAY  |  July 15, 2008

Dysfunction junction

A Delicate Balance  is 40 years old now, but like the patrician clan at the frightened heart of it, the play has good bones.
A Delicate Balance; The Gibson Girl; Some Men
By CAROLYN CLAY  |  March 25, 2008


As the Huntington Theatre Company mounts Radio Golf , the ghost in the rafters is that of Wilson, who died last October at 60, soon after completing this final piece of his grand project chronicling decade by decade the African-American experience of t
Radio Golf ; bobrauschenbergamerica ; I Am My Own Wife
By CAROLYN CLAY  |  September 20, 2006