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Latest Articles


Review: Bonefish Grill

There are chains that give chain restaurants a bad name, that think earned popularity can be franchised.
A well-polished and very tasty link
By BILL RODRIGUEZ  |  February 08, 2013

Happy returns

George Balanchine didn’t go in for productions of the old classic ballets.
Boston Ballet’s Coppélia , Alvin Ailey at the Wang
By MARCIA B. SIEGEL  |  April 23, 2010

Let's get Russian

The quick back-story on Kino Proby: Three Mainers take a liking to the Russian band Kino, and its legendary lead singer Viktor Tsoi, who died in a car wreck in 1990 after becoming maybe the single most famous Russian rock star.
A live album for a dead rock singer from Kino Proby
By SAM PFEIFLE  |  January 08, 2010

Booked solid

The holidays are over — time to hit the books.
A hefty season of fiction, non-fiction, and poetry
By BARBARA HOFFERT  |  January 01, 2010

On Westminster: Coffee and Iggy Pop

Andrew Losowsky and Lyra Monteiro, husband and wife, are huddled around a small table in a chilly and mostly empty room on the bottom floor of the Kresge building on West-minster Street in downtown Providence.
Storytelling Dept.
By DAVID SCHARFENBERG  |  December 11, 2009

News worth paying for?

The Providence Journal , offering a rare window onto its own affairs, recently reported that the newspaper could start charging for access to large swaths of as early as the first quarter of next year.
The ProJo considers charging for access to its Web site
By DAVID SCHARFENBERG  |  December 04, 2009


Punch drunk

Charges have finally come in on Aqib Talib, the frequently high (if you believe his pre-draft drug tests) and drafted-up-high (20th overall in 2008) Tampa Bay Buccaneers cornerback who reportedly decked a cabbie because . . . well, it’s still not exactly
Aqib Talib's press coverage. Plus, the Whizzinator wilts, and Christmas comes early to Philly.
By MATT TAIBBI  |  October 30, 2009

Both ears and the tail for this Carmen

"World Passions," the collection of four works that Boston Ballet opened at the Opera House last night, was more pleasant than passionate until Kathleen Breen Combes sashayed out as the title character in Jorma Elo's Carmen .
Boston Ballet's 'World Passions'
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  October 30, 2009

America's scam

What a year for former New England Patriots and the criminal-justice system!
Eugene Lockhart funds his own buyout. Plus, why do pro athletes hate cabbies?
By MATT TAIBBI  |  September 11, 2009


There may, in the end, be no way to save the American metropolitan newspaper. Plummeting advertising revenue and competition from the Internet often seem forces too daunting for even the savviest of publishers.
The Projo 's ultra-local approach could save the paper — or spell its demise
By DAVID SCHARFENBERG  |  August 28, 2009

Review: Cold Souls

What if human souls were as interchangeable as hearts, kidneys, movie concepts, and auto parts? Writer/director Sophie Barthes's feature debut toys with the notion, but instead of breaking new ground, Cold Souls settles for rehashing elements from oth
Paul Giamatti can't heat up Cold Souls
By PETER KEOUGH  |  August 14, 2009


Dark night of the soul

St. Petersburg's Eifman Ballet presents Eugene Onegin at the Cutler Majestic Theatre this weekend.
Boris Eifman's Eugene Onegin
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  May 15, 2009

Home cooking

If the name "National Philharmonic of Russia" puts you in mind of some provincial Slavic ensemble making the American rounds, you're not alone.
The National Philharmonic of Russia at Symphony Hall
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  May 01, 2009

Restoring a master

When Marc Chagall died in 1985 at the age of 98 he was internationally famous, wealthy, and had lived to see a museum built for him by the French government.
A new biography seeks to redefine Marc Chagall's place in art history
By KEN GREENLEAF  |  March 25, 2009

Cooking with two Russians

Yulia Converse welcomed me into her kitchen in Maine to learn from her mother, Alla Zagoruyko, how to make authentic Russian borsht.
A day of authenticity, gross assumption, and great soup
By LINDSAY STERLING  |  March 11, 2009


By the time you read this, you've either seen or missed one of Boston's most exciting opera productions, Opera Boston's brilliant version of Shostakovich's The Nose .
Opera Boston doesn't blow The Nose — plus Yannick Nézet-Séguin's BSO debut and the return of Lang Lang
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  March 03, 2009


Crowning glory

In 1967, George Balanchine created Jewels for New York City Ballet, and in short order this evening-length triptych — Emeralds , Rubies , and Diamonds — became the crown jewel of 20th-century dance.
Boston Ballet's Jewels
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  February 27, 2009


Tribute bands are usually considered blights, godsends, or novelties of dubious value.
Kino Proby pay tribute to a legend
By DAN CLARK  |  January 07, 2009

Sex and food and Abraham Lincoln

We put out a call to our contributors to suggest appropriate holiday gift books and what do we get back?
Gift books for every (perverse) taste
By PHOENIX STAFF  |  December 02, 2008

Vertical energy

The word “concerto” comes from the Italian for “to bring into agreement,” and it’s not always as easy as soloists and symphony orchestras make it seem.
Irina Muresanu gave an emotionally compelling performance, even if her view of the Tchaikovsky Violin Concerto didn’t always jibe with conductor Jonathan McPhee’s.
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  November 14, 2008

Conscientious objectors

How do people become fanatics? When does individual conscience take a stand?  
Two films on being fanatic
By PETER KEOUGH  |  October 27, 2008


Getting hitched

It's a show that stretches from va-va-voom to the solemn roots of marriage in our culture. And maybe says a bit about — if I dare be so grand — the magical, irresistible force of love.
‘Wedded Bliss’ at the Peabody Essex Museum
By GREG COOK  |  July 22, 2008

Russian revel?

The Russians are coming!
Looking ahead to Ballets Russes 2009
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  May 23, 2008

Flash without fire

The aim of the DeCordova Museum’s Annual Exhibition is to round up “some of the most interesting and visually eloquent” New England artists.
Is New England better than the DeCordova’s Annual Exhibition?
By GREG COOK  |  May 13, 2008


The end of a three-week, thousands-of-miles-from-home season is never the right time to assess a dance company.
The Kirov's Balanchine at City Center
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  May 06, 2008

Dunkin' rage

They were siblings in a spat.
By IAN SANDS  |  March 19, 2008



Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream is a dizzy dance of a drama, meandering mystifyingly between May Eve and Midsummer Eve under a moon that goes from new to full swifter than arrow from the Tartar’s bow.
Boston Ballet illumines George Balanchine’s  A Midsummer Night’s Dream
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  January 24, 2008

Ebb and flow

The good news is that we still have our own major company, Boston Ballet, and it made its first international tour — to Spain — in more than a decade.
Dance: 2007 in review
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  December 17, 2007

Wikipedia rules

The ancient Library at Alexandria, once the largest on Earth, housed perhaps 500,000 volumes.
Wikipedia doubled its number of articles in just 18 months. But who are the “Wikipediots” writing them? And why do they do it?
By MIKE MILIARD  |  December 12, 2007

Baritone bliss?

??, ???, ??? ?? — oops, sorry, that’s what happens when the conversation around you is all-Russian-all-the-time.
??????? ????????????? at Symphony Hall
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  December 11, 2007