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Sarah Caldwell

Latest Articles

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Review: Beethoven with the Discovery Ensemble, the BSO, and Opera Boston

We've had a good deal of Beethoven recently, with the high bar being set by young Courtney Lewis — a former Zander Fellow and the current assistant conductor of the Minnesota Orchestra — and his extraordinary young chamber orchestra, Discovery Ensemble
Heroes and villains
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  October 29, 2010
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Snakebite

"I can no longer stand to let this travesty continue," sings a character in Madame White Snake , the new opera based on an ancient Chinese legend co-commissioned by Opera Boston, which has just presented its world premiere. I'm afraid I shared the senti
Opera Boston presents the world premiere of Madame White Snake; plus the Leipzig Gewandhaus and Boston Philharmonic
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  March 05, 2010
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Blessings: mixed and otherwise

By odd coincidence, in recent weeks we’ve had performances of two important operatic rarities, landmark early works a century apart: 30-year-old Handel’s Amadigi (1715) and 20-year-old Rossini’s Tancredi (1813, his 10th opera!).
Boston Baroque’s Amadigi; Opera Boston’s Tancredi; the BSO’s Beethoven; the Borromeo’s Bartók; Brahms from BCMS and BSOCP
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  October 30, 2009
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No place like home

The first thing audiences see when the curtain goes up on Boston Ballet's Giselle is our heroine's charming Rhineland-village home, a rustic abode that in Peter Farmer's set is framed by birches, a symbol of fidelity.
Boston Ballet's Giselle fits right in
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  October 09, 2009
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Puccini goes punk

Perched on the lid of a lace-draped baby grand, a bobblehead quivers along with Christine Teeters's vibrato as she powers through a Tuesday-night voice lesson in the Steinway Piano Building on Boylston Street.
Faced with diminishing mainstream opportunities, Boston's young opera singers are going small and making the repertoire their own
By SARA FAITH ALTERMAN  |  January 21, 2009
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Wild things

Jane Ring Frank's Boston Secession, which calls itself a "professional choral ensemble," began its 12th season with a short but ambitious program.
Boston Secession, the Takács Quartet and Muzsikás, Russell Sherman
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  November 18, 2008


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Luciano Pavarotti, 1935–2007

Luciano Pavarotti was so famous, so beloved, he became the first classical musician since 1940s violinist Jascha Heifetz to have his name become generic.
Generic for tenor
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  September 17, 2007
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Beverly Sills, 1929–2007

Beverly Sills, the most loved American opera singer of her generation, died this past week from inoperable lung cancer at 78.
The fun diva
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  July 11, 2007
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Unmasked

It would be fun to report that in the same weekend Bostonians got to hear two operas from two different centuries that take place on their home turf.
Boston Lyric Opera’s Un ballo in maschera ; Scott Wheeler’s The Construction of Boston
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  April 05, 2007
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Stormy weather

The BSO has been having terrible luck hanging on to its star soloists.
BSO cancellations, plus the Camerata, Jonathan Biss, Emmanuel Music, and more
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  March 28, 2007
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Rise and fall

With its production of the Kurt Weill/Bertolt Brecht Aufstieg und Fall der Stadt Mahagonny, Opera Boston consolidates its position as this city’s most exciting opera company.
Opera Boston does Mahagonny; the BSO and the Boston Philharmonic do Sibelius
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  March 13, 2007


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Damned good

James Levine returned from his winter break with one of the most thrilling BSO concerts of his tenure: Berlioz’s “dramatic legend,” La damnation de Faust.
Levine’s Berlioz and Wuorinen, Garrick Ohlsson’s Beethoven, the Borromeo’s Shostakovich, the Alloy’s Eagle
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  February 20, 2007
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The best of times, the worst of times

This year Boston classical music lost some of its most beloved figures — some, like mezzo-soprano Lorraine Hunt Lieberson, at the very height of their extraordinary powers, others, like opera director Sarah Caldwell and her conductor/collaborator, Osbo
A year in classical
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  December 20, 2006
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Harvard Square

Harvard Square was very different 40 years ago.
Ground zero for so much, for so many
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  November 15, 2006
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Landmarks

Seventy-four years after Schoenberg composed (but never finished) Moses und Aron , this towering 20th-century masterwork got its first Boston Symphony Orchestra performance.
The BSO’s Moses und Aron  and Emmanuel Music’s Orlando
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  October 31, 2006
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From Knoxville to Swan Lake and back

As our most prestigious classical-music institution, the Boston Symphony Orchestra ought to be every year’s headliner, and once again, under the adventuresome direction of James Levine, it is.
A chock-full season of classical music
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  September 13, 2006


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Angels sing

One of the most memorable moments in Angels in America is the entrance of the Angel, who comes crashing down through Prior Walter’s ceiling.
Tony Kushner’s Pulitzer winner becomes an opera
By IRIS FANGER  |  June 07, 2006
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Opera’s great loss

When the curtain went up at Boston’s Back Bay Theatre for the American premiere of Arnold Schoenberg’s Moses und Aron , in November 1966, two figures were standing back to back in a spotlight on a small disc.
Sarah Caldwell, 1924–2006
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  March 29, 2006

Obits

The new year brought news of some great losses to the musical world.
The musical community laments
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  January 19, 2006