Rie Ichikawa

Latest Articles


Sparring with the Ultimate

There’s never been a more brilliant exemplar of the ballet art than George Balanchine.
Boston Ballet in The Four Temperaments, Apollo, and Theme and Variations
By MARICA B. SIEGEL  |  May 14, 2010

Theme and variations

George Balanchine was famous for “non-story” ballets, but when you put three of his works — the usual number to fill up an evening — together, you always get some kind of narrative.
Boston Ballet’s ‘Ultimate Balanchine’
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  May 14, 2010

Here’s looking at you

Set in the usual small village — this one in the Carpathian Mountains of Eastern Europe — Coppélia might look like just another pleasant 19th-century ballet about a boy, a girl, and another girl. But appearances can be deceiving — and that’s theme of
Boston Ballet sees into the heart of Coppélia
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  April 09, 2010

Dance noir

Looking for a spooky Valentine? Try Jirí Kylián's Black and White .
The Czech choreographer/Nederlands Dans Theater director made an evening out of five pieces — No More Play, Petite Mort, Sarabande, Falling Angels, and Sechs Tänze — he'd created between 1986 and 1991.
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  February 13, 2009

Wising up

Sergei Prokofiev’s two classical ballets invariably find Boston Ballet playing the dating game.
James Kudelka’s Cinderella at Boston Ballet
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  October 17, 2008

State of the art

Maybe it’s the economy, but Boston Ballet’s third-annual season-opening gala was a sober evening, without the orchestral overture that graced the first two affairs.  
Boston Ballet’s third ‘Night of Stars’
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  October 17, 2008


Mastering the masterpieces

It’s not exactly a trip down Memory Lane, but this weekend Boston Ballet is revisiting some pieces and choreographers it hasn’t performed in the Mikko Nissinen era.
Boston Ballet takes on Balanchine, Tudor, and Tharp
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  May 21, 2008

Quo vadis?

“Next Generation” is the kind of ballet-program title that might have you asking yourself what happened to “This Generation."
Boston Ballet’s ‘Next Generation’
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  March 10, 2008

At long last love?

Boston Ballet has been playing the Romeo and Juliet dating game for almost 25 years now.
Boston Ballet hitches up with John Cranko’s Romeo & Juliet
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  February 20, 2008


Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream is a dizzy dance of a drama, meandering mystifyingly between May Eve and Midsummer Eve under a moon that goes from new to full swifter than arrow from the Tartar’s bow.
Boston Ballet illumines George Balanchine’s  A Midsummer Night’s Dream
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  January 24, 2008

Dark victory

It’s a good pairing: together, Serenade and La Sylphide write an essay on doomed love
Boston Ballet in Serenade and La Sylphide
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  October 31, 2007


Love after death

At 166 years old and sporting miles of white tulle, Giselle can look pretty moldy.
Boston Ballet redeems Giselle
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  May 14, 2007

Impossible dream?

Don Quixote has been a watershed work for Boston Ballet.
Rudolf Nureyev’s Don Quixote has yet to earn its knighthood
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  October 25, 2006

Lambarena redux

All summer long I’ve had the phrase “Do the Lambarena” running through my head, as if it were a dance craze, like the la-dee-dah or the lambada.
Pacific Northwest Ballet and Choreftes at JP, plus BB 2006 – 2007 and a DVD surprise
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  August 23, 2006

Pensées mal gardées

Boston Ballet’s second production of Frederick Ashton’s La Fille Mal Gardée made it clearer than ever what a fractured fairy tale this is. The pastoral scrim that’s revealed when the curtain goes up sports a surly Demeter bearing a sheaf of grain and
Plus, fantasy Filles
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  March 14, 2006