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Bon appétit!

Luis Meléndez himself greets you at the outset of "Luis Meléndez: Master of the Spanish Still Life" at the Museum of Fine Arts. He seems a haughty 31-year-old in this 1746 self-portrait, standing in a fine silk coat and ruffled shirt and holding up a cha
The delicious art of Luis Meléndez
By GREG COOK  |  February 12, 2010

Review: Il divo

Luigi Pirandello's most famous work is a play about six characters in search of an author.
The 'life' of Giulio Andreotti
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  June 05, 2009

Foreign correspondence

Guest curator Viera Levitt avoids the usual scenes of dreary apartment blocks and industrial sites of Europe’s former communist countries.
Central European videos and more at URI
By GREG COOK  |  February 05, 2008

The 100 unsexiest men 2007: 10-1

These guys couldn't turn on a radio
By  |  April 14, 2007

Natural born liar

If you ever wanted a definition of “congenital liar,” just look at Dick “Big Time” Cheney.  
“Shots and Beer” lives in persistent denial
By PHILLIPE & JORGE  |  January 31, 2007

Crossword: 'Re: LAX'

Know the code, and you'll land safely
By MATT JONES  |  January 17, 2007

Flashbacks: August 11, 2006

These selections, culled from our back files, were compiled by Doug Fleischer, Sam MacLaughlin, and Hannah Van Susteren.
The Boston Phoenix has been covering the trends and events that shape our times since 1966.
By EDITORIAL  |  August 08, 2006

Measure for measure

“Great Ball at the Court of France,” which Ensemble Doulce Mémoire presented at the First Congregational Church in Cambridge last Friday, under the auspices of the Boston Early Music Festival, was a reminder that classical music used to be all about two
Ensemble Doulce Mémoire, Matthew Bourne’s Swan Lake , Robert Spano’s Sibelius , H&H’s St. Matthew Passion
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  April 26, 2006

Ballet birds

It’s been a decade since Matthew Bourne’s Swan Lake burst into the public consciousness, transforming the familiar image of the ballet swan, with her crown of feathers and undulating arms, into a feral, malevolent male bird surrounded by his fearsome
Matthew Bourne’s swans fly in  
By IRIS FANGER  |  April 13, 2006