Philip Roth

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Magic tricks

You have to give a seventysomething writer credit for daring to begin a book with “He’d lost his magic.”
Alice Munro has them, Philip Roth doesn’t
By ED SIEGEL  |  November 13, 2009

No assignments here

Need a break from all that required reading this fall? You're in luck. In
An enjoyable reading list
By DEIRDRE FULTON  |  September 18, 2009

Tall tales

This fall brings fiction and poetry lovers new treats from old friends.
Novelists and poets set fancies flying
By BARBARA HOFFERT  |  September 18, 2009

Positively Phil

We all know Philip Roth’s preoccupations.
Roth goes back to college
By RICHARD BECK  |  September 16, 2008

One sings, one doesn’t

This year, at least one element in “Boston Film Festival” is no longer true.
The BFF has little to celebrate; the HFA has ‘Edward Yang’
By PETER KEOUGH  |  September 10, 2008

Winners and sinners

Ah, fall, when Nobel Prize winners are announced — and, now, when past winners turn up with more good reading.
Barth, Bolaño, Roth, Morrison, and more
By BARBARA HOFFERT  |  September 08, 2008



Cruz, who bares all in her finest performance since her days as Pedro Almodóvar’s muse.
Sex and power dominate in this Roth adaptation
By TOM MEEK  |  August 20, 2008

Fresh fare

For the fourth consecutive summer, Brown/Trinity Playwrights Repertory Theatre has been showcasing new work by emerging playwrights.
Smart work from the Brown/Trinity Rep Playwrights Repertory Theatre
By BILL RODRIGUEZ  |  July 30, 2008

The yenta monologues

What do you call a Conservative Jewish lesbian mother of two boys? Very funny, in the case of Judy Gold.
Judy Gold’s Jewish-mother complex
By ED SIEGEL  |  December 26, 2007

American dreamer

It’s difficult to think of an American writer with a story more inspiring than Ha Jin’s.
Ha Jin retraces his journey
By JOHN FREEMAN  |  October 15, 2007

History tour

Whitewash has floated like a soap scum on the bloodbath of America’s past as told in the history books.
Zeitgeist’s compelling   Kentucky Cycle; Double Edge’s Republic of Dreams
By CAROLYN CLAY  |  October 09, 2007


War, peace, and Robert Pinsky

Every few years, a fall publishing season emerges that should remind us that Boston could be the literary epicenter of America.
The season's fiction, non-fiction, and poetry
By JOHN FREEMAN  |  September 12, 2007

War and peace

More often than not, when an artist gets airplay covering a decades-old song, it’s out of desperation — the sign of a career on its way down.
Cowboy Junkies expand their reach
By TED DROZDOWSKI  |  May 08, 2007

Great sex

Call me a literary perv.
How to write it
By IAN SANDS  |  February 19, 2007

Trump of judgment

“Some people cast shadows,” wrote Donald Trump in a 2005 letter to the New York Times Book Review , “and other people choose to live in those shadows. To each his own.”
The Apprentice , I’m from Rolling Stone , and Beauty and the Geek
By JAMES PARKER  |  January 11, 2007

The Paris Review Interview, Vol. 1 introduction by Philip Gourevitch

Picador, 524 pages, $16
By JON GARELICK  |  December 04, 2006


Lions and lambs

The season is notable for the return to bookstores of canonical names like Atwood, Ginsberg, Kinnell, le Carré, Munro, Pynchon, and Vidal plus a fair share of younger lions like Eggers, Julavits, and Muldoon.
Pynchon isn’t all you’ll be reading this fall  
By JOHN FREEMAN  |  September 13, 2006

Looking for a love

Your eyes met across the (bar/theater/bath house).
An imagined guide to hookups and taped-together missed conversations  
By JESSICA GROSE  |  August 30, 2006

Falwell U

This article originally appeared in the August 4, 1981 issue of the Boston Phoenix .
The Moral Majority's higher education
By JERE REAL  |  August 03, 2006

Brooklyn and the bottle

Donald Margulies’s Brooklyn Boy , which is receiving a creditable Boston premiere production from SpeakEasy Stage Company chronicles the identity crisis of Eric Weiss (Victor Warren), a Jewish writer from Sheepshead Bay now rounding middle age.
Donald Margulies from SpeakEasy, Alcoholics Anonymous from New Rep
By STEVE VINEBERG  |  June 19, 2006

Something to talk about

Is it possible to rate the “single best work of American fiction published in the last 25 years?”
The New York Times ranks recent fiction
By NINA MACLAUGHLIN  |  June 07, 2006


Everybody hurts

"I don't usually find myself thinking anything's too fucked up," says Sherman. "I write what I want to."
In short stories about messed-up teenage sex, alcholic parents, and other rebellions of the flesh, author Rachel Sherman rubs fiction readers the right way
By NINA MACLAUGHLIN  |  May 31, 2006

Sweet slob

Absurdistan , an amplified Slavomerican mash-up of a novel, begs for a hyperbolic descriptive sentence to express its catch-all style.
Gary Shteyngart’s satirical mash-up
By DANA KLETTER  |  May 17, 2006

Good reads

According to the Greeks, spring is the season of rebirth, when Persephone was released from Hades and mom Demeter celebrated with flowers.
From Roth to Hall, and non-fiction, too
By JOHN FREEMAN  |  March 09, 2006