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No. 9 Park

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Bitter truths

Bitter truths


Photo: JOEL VEAKWe spend much of our time talking about alcohol in consideration of its form (its tastes, colors, and textures), but less frequently do...
By Luke ONeil  |  October 03, 2011
The many sides of splurging: A guide to decadent local dishes worth the cash and calories

The many sides of splurging: A guide to decadent local dishes worth the cash and calories


Photo: JOEL VEAK From a single ounce of sturgeon caviar at L'Espalier to a fat slice of seven-layer chocolate cake from your neighborhood bakery (bonus...
By Ruth Tobias  |  March 21, 2011

Most Overlooked Craft Cocktail Program


When John Gertsen left No. 9 Park (9 Park Street, Boston, 617.742.9991) to helm Drink, he took the press spotlight with him. It would be...
By Stuff Boston  |  October 05, 2009
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On the 10th drink of Christmas

Seen through the right lens, Christmas looks like a season of devilish malevolence — a time of gloomy cold, bad movies, gift anxiety and consumer hoards, inane music repeated indefinitely, and family, hour after hour, day after chatty day.
Navigating the holidays with seasonal stagger
By JAYSON O’BRYAN  |  December 08, 2008
Tonic For What Ails You

Tonic For What Ails You


Not just gin anymore

Suppose you really savored your daily swig of mouthwash or craved the occasional tall, cool glass of PeptoBismol. Suppose your fondness for said elixir was in fact such that you were inclined, come cocktail hour, to mix it with a jigger of Bombay Sapphire and kick back with your own private highball.

You might even call it a gin and tonic.

After all, at its broadest, tonic is simply a synonym for “medicine,” for “restorative.” Hence its conflation with tonic water, whose key ingredient, quinine — derived from the bark of an evergreen indigenous to South America, though it’s also produced synthetically — has been used for centuries to ameliorate malaria (some New Age healers claim it relieves muscle cramps, too).

By Ruth Tobias  |  September 22, 2008
Crash Courses: A writer returns to Boston to brush up on the latest in local dining and drinking

Crash Courses: A writer returns to Boston to brush up on the latest in local dining and drinking


Okay, here’s a math problem for all you clever so-and-sos crawling one of the world’s most educated cities: if a food writer travels 1900 miles from her new hometown of Denver to her old one of Boston to catch up on the current dining scene, how many days does it take her to hit 10 restaurants, down 30 drinks, sample 25 dishes, and gain five pounds?

If you guessed two and a half, you get a gold star. But so do I. I took a crash course in multicourses and passed with top honors. For that matter, so did the chefs, bartenders, and servers I tested in turn, dishing up as they did the creamiest of this summer’s crop. Now it’s time for you just-returned vacationers and brand-new arrivals to brush up on the latest in local dining. So here are the Cliffs Notes — and here’s hoping my crash diet goes half so swimmingly.


By Ruth Tobias  |  September 08, 2008


The future of food


We’re constantly on the lookout for the “next big thing.” How nice that when it comes to the restaurant world, No. 9 Park (9 Park...
By Heather Bouzan  |  April 22, 2008