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Flying blind: A primary-season post-mortem

With little public polling on the most hotly contested races in memory, Rhode Island’s pundit class was in the dark as the primary approached. But could the presence of a high-profile gay candidate make opinion surveys suspect anyway?
With little public polling on the most hotly contested races in memory, Rhode Island’s pundit class was in the dark as the primary approached
By DAVID SCHARFENBERG  |  September 17, 2010

Interview and photos: Gerard Malanga

In Walt Whitman’s notebook for the 1855 edition of Leaves of Grass , he writes, “Every soul has its own individual voice.” That notion rang true for photographer/poet/filmmaker Gerard Malanga as he put together “Souls,” an exhibit of 100 portraits span
A gathering of souls
By KRISTEN GOODFRIEND  |  April 02, 2010

Ken Miller just can’t win

What’s an honorable man to do?
Brown biology professor attacked by Darwin-hating fundies and leftie atheists alike
By DAVID SCHARFENBERG  |  March 05, 2010

No identity crisis

If great art and great artists are supposed to contain multitudes, then in music, at least, pianists have the edge: 10 fingers theoretically capable of 10 different simultaneous paths for the music to take. Of course, it's not that simple.
Nando Michelin and Matt Steckler know who they are
By JON GARELICK  |  January 29, 2010

Camera crazy

With a large number of new entrants, and several returning filmmakers, the fourth annual Portland Phoenix Maine Short Film Festival was a rousing success.
Local filmmakers show off their talents in our fourth Short-Film Festival
By DEIRDRE FULTON  |  November 27, 2009

Can we fix our broken suburbs?

Action Speaks!, the panel discussion series at Providence art space AS220, wraps up its fall run with a look at the American adventure in suburbia.
Action Speaks!
By DAVID SCHARFENBERG  |  October 23, 2009


Jazz on paper

A gem of a show, two shows really, has quietly appeared at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art.
Romare Bearden's improv collage
By KEN GREENLEAF  |  October 23, 2009


There may, in the end, be no way to save the American metropolitan newspaper. Plummeting advertising revenue and competition from the Internet often seem forces too daunting for even the savviest of publishers.
The Projo 's ultra-local approach could save the paper — or spell its demise
By DAVID SCHARFENBERG  |  August 28, 2009

Tormenting Teddy

After 32 years in the US Senate, Ted Kennedy remains a force to be reckoned with, both for his legendary family history and his considerable accomplishments.
Republicans threaten Kennedy reign
By BOSTON PHOENIX STAFF  |  August 28, 2009

Bit players

What do you get when you cross NYU music-technology majors just out of their teens, vintage Nintendo Entertainment System and Game Boy gear, traditional rock-and-roll instruments, a mysterious, robot-building fellow named José with half a middle finger
Anamanaguchi are a shock to the systems
By MICHAEL ALAN GOLDBERG  |  June 05, 2009

He's not a doctor . . .

Around this time four years ago, contemporary hip-hop tastemaker Dawaun Parker faced the same dilemma that most soon-to-be music-school grads negotiate: should he become a performer, a songwriter, or a barista?
. . . but he plays with one in LA. As hip-hop's newest secret weapon — and Dr. Dre's right-hand man — Berklee grad Dawaun Parker is helping resuscitate rap's biggest stars.
By CHRIS FARAONE  |  May 15, 2009


Slideshow: Marcel Breuer at RISD

The RISD Museum presents "Marcel Breuer: Design and Architecture," a major retrospective of the late Bauhaus designer's furniture and buildings, through July 19.
"Marcel Breuer: Design and Architecture" at RISD Museum through July 19

The power of 'Cool'

"New York Cool" is required viewing for anyone who has an interest in contemporary American art. Comprised of nearly 80 works, the show, at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art through July 19.
A contemporary-art show at Bowdoin is a must-see
By KEN GREENLEAF  |  April 24, 2009

The Chair Man

It is one of the icons of 20th-century design. What distinguishes Marcel Breuer's B34 armchair from 1928 is its materials (fabric seats slung between steel tubing) and the lack of rear legs.
A major Breuer retrospective opens at RISD
By GREG COOK  |  April 17, 2009

Interview: Mitch Fatel

Given that he was once an intern for Howard Stern, it's not too surprising that comedian Mitch Fatel is all about clits and tits, and assorted lady bits – not the stuff that feminists would gleefully shave their legs over.
Fatel hates the Yankees, loves stand-up
By SARA FAITH ALTERMAN  |  March 18, 2009

Review: Department of Eagles

At the Brattle Theatre Sunday, Fred Nicolaus, guitarist from the Brooklyn-based duo Department of Eagles, announced that they'd play a song from their little-known 2003 debut album, The Whitey on the Moon UK LP . "It's not very good," he warned.
Brattle Theater, January 18, 2009
By CAITLIN E. CURRAN  |  January 20, 2009


Groups + solos

First on the list of this year's points of interest is the anticipated Portland Museum of Art Biennial, which opens in early April.
Looking forward to 2009
By KEN GREENLEAF  |  December 31, 2008

Dailies go Darwin

If you're a tree, you're probably feeling pretty good right now.
Reports of newspapers' death are exaggerated — but after the changes coming in 2009, will we still recognize them?
By ADAM REILLY  |  December 30, 2008

Drugs and culture

University of Southern Maine professor Wendy Chapkis usually studies, teaches, and writes about gender issues, so her latest non-fiction outing, Dying to Get High: Marijuana as Medicine , might seem like a bit of a departure.
By DEIRDRE FULTON  |  December 03, 2008

CMJ in one day

The Gray Lady of indie music fests ain’t what she used to be
By CHRIS FARAONE  |  October 29, 2008

Cry me a river

It would seem that Sophocles has been hanging around for 2500 years waiting to be improved — and the makeover artists have been numerous.  
The Dreams of Antigone; In the Continuum; Show Boat
By CAROLYN CLAY  |  October 01, 2008



Is Twitter bad for journalism?
Is it time to dial down journalism’s latest fad?
By ADAM REILLY  |  September 25, 2008

Oil's well

Twelve American universities with Persian Gulf campuses

Are universities selling out to oil nations?

As Academia searches for elusive dollars in a downward economy, oil-rich nations are enticing American schools to open satellite campuses in the Gulf.
As their big bucks beckon, Gulf campuses boom
By HARVEY SILVERGLATE  |  September 24, 2008


In the weeks leading up to the start of the college tour, I fell into one of my depressions, and with it some strange and disconcerting new sensations presented themselves.
In her new memoir, When I Grow Up , Boston icon Juliana Hatfield comes clean about her depression, and why Wal-Mart would have been blamed for her suicide
By JULIANA HATFIELD  |  September 17, 2008

Body politic

Anna Deavere Smith is a writer/actor/activist who listens.
Interview: Anna Deavere Smith contains multitudes
By IRIS FANGER  |  September 02, 2008



This new grand-theoretical manifesto might be completely daft.
Slavoj Žižek’s revolution
By GEORGE SCIALABBA  |  August 12, 2008

The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants 2

Like Sex and the City: The Movie, Sanaa Hamri’s continuation of the journey of a pair of jeans that magically fit four girls of disparate genes feels tailored for the small screen.
Disjointed, sketchy, and saccharine
By BRETT MICHEL  |  August 05, 2008

Bicyclists strike a blow for affordable housing

30 bicyclists shoved off a few weeks ago from the Brown Boat House in Providence to begin a two-and-a-half-month journey to Seattle.
Good deeds
By A.J. PACITTIV  |  July 16, 2008

Interview: The DeCordova’s new director holds forth

Dennis Kois (rhymes with voice) began work as the new executive director of the DeCordova Museum and Sculpture Park in Lincoln on June 2.
Voice of Kois
By GREG COOK  |  June 24, 2008