Nathaniel Hawthorne

Latest Articles


Review: Pontine explores Hawthorne's ancestral thriller

Perhaps nowhere in America is the past as tangible a presence as it is in New England.
Spirit world
By MEGAN GRUMBLING  |  April 30, 2011

Review: Easy A

At least Emma Stone gets high marks in this teen comedy.
Emma Stone brings her A game
By TOM MEEK  |  September 24, 2010

Grave Spotting

I asked the question this way: "Where would you want to be buried?" Not "do," but "would." That is to say if, by chance, you were to die, unlikely as that might be, where would you want to spend all of nonexistence?
Spooky? A bit, but Massachusetts's cemeteries are also the bucolic, final resting places of many great American writers.
By NINA MACLAUGHLIN  |  June 18, 2010

Hardboiled hub

When I was growing up in Roslindale a few decades back — among tribes of ignorant, second-generation immigrant kids whose favorite words began with “f” and “n” and who liked to torture small animals and beat up small children before they moved on to thei
The city’s gritty, criminal underbelly has redefined the dark, artistic vision known as Boston noir
By PETER KEOUGH  |  October 23, 2009

Max & Dylan's Kitchen & Bar

Who is Max? Who is Dylan? The casual visitor cannot know. We know that the owners also have Scollay Square (which is not located in what used to be that square), so we have our suspicions that Max and Dylan are children or cats, or a confected evocation
From the owners of Scollay Square, another fine bar-restaurant that does everything fairly well
By ROBERT NADEAU  |  July 17, 2009
putnam list

Before the Goldrush

With a name right out of a Nathaniel Hawthorne novel and hand-pressed CD packaging graced with images of antique farming tools, Putnam Smith does nothing to dispel the notion that he wouldn't mind living in 1809 instead of 2009.
Putnam Smith can't quite find his way home
By SAM PFEIFLE  |  May 29, 2009

scarlet list

An awkward adaptation

Times change, but the frailties of the human heart . . . not so much. That overworked muscle can be haplessly generous or slammed-door shut. Nathaniel Hawthorne's mid-19th century novel The Scarlet Letter still stands as a perceptive examination of th
Times change, but the frailties of the human heart . . . not so much.
By BILL RODRIGUEZ  |  May 15, 2009

Ride, Captain, Ride

The mighty Captain Blowhard was back in the news quite prominently with his stop sign-rolling, curb-jumping antics behind the wheel that led the Jamestown police to suggest that he come out with his driver's license and hands up, following similar ass
Sundlun gets off the road. Plus, as A for the Gamm, and corporate lies
By PHILLIPE AND JORGE  |  May 08, 2009


Jhumpa Lahiri won a Pulitzer Prize with her first collection of short stories, Interpreter of Maladies .
Jhumpa Lahiri tends her garden
By ED SIEGEL  |  April 22, 2008

Left out

I first heard about Stanley five years ago, from a firefighter up on Munjoy Hill.
There's a lot in Portland's past the "history" books won't tell you
By BRENDAN HUGHES  |  January 30, 2008

On Portland’s poet

It’s a testament to much of what’s good about America that one of her first and most popular poets had such reverence, and such affection, for so many of her stories.
Celebrating Longfellow’s words
By MEGAN GRUMBLING  |  October 31, 2007


What’s in a name?

The discovery that we’ve had Lane’s name wrong since at least 1913 has prompted questions about what else scholars have gotten wrong about him.
Why it’s Fitz Henry, not Fitz Hugh, Lane — and why it matters
By GREG COOK  |  August 31, 2007

The mind’s eye

Several Trinity Repertory Company actors sit before microphones in a WRNI studio.
Trinity gets dramatic on WRNI
By BILL RODRIGUEZ  |  April 03, 2007

Read all about it

Riding there red line from Central Square to Park Street recently, a friend of mine from Philadelphia surveyed the length of the train and said, “You don’t see this in Philly.”
Some of Boston’s best bars have a literary history
By NINA MACLAUGHLIN  |  September 01, 2006

In the mind of the beholder

Groundbreaking takes on new meaning when it’s applied to the work of Kate Ericson and Mel Ziegler, the subjects of an important new show at MIT’s List Center.
Kate Ericson and Mel Ziegler at MIT
By CHRISTOPHER MILLIS  |  March 15, 2006