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MECA faculty re-imagine the natural world and play with nostalgia
MECA faculty re-imagine the natural world and play with nostalgia
By ANNIE LARMON  |  December 04, 2009

Weathering the weather

Sweltering summer heat is finally upon us, along with how-to-keep-cool considerations.
Going Green
By DEIRDRE FULTON  |  August 07, 2009


Novelist Julian Barnes is a brilliant writer, but he’s not self-revelatory.
Julian Barnes considers the abyss
By AMY FINCH  |  December 22, 2008

Could algae be the answer for Rhode Island’s heating needs?

Scot Comey believes old mills in places like Pawtucket can be turned into incubators for strains of algae that can be grown without sunlight and turned into home heating oil.
Weird Science
By CARROLL ANDREW MORSE  |  September 10, 2008

Biolab follies

In the beginning — way back in the fall of 2003, when the “War on Terror” was still young — the notion that anything could derail the Boston University biolab seemed absurd.
How did BU's research facility go from slam dunk to almost sunk?
By ADAM REILLY  |  April 07, 2008

They shall not pass gas

Lines upon learning that scientists have recently isolated methane-mitigating microbes in the intestinal lining of the kangaroo, and plan to replicate them in cattle to reduce the emission of “cow-created” greenhouse gas
Could be verse: poetry ripped from the headlines
By JAMES PARKER  |  December 12, 2007


Last man standing

In his 1954 novel I Am Legend , Richard Matheson conjured up a terrifying scenario: a man-made plague has killed most of humanity.
Once a cautionary tale about human folly, has the doomsday myth become just more fun and games?
By PETER KEOUGH  |  December 12, 2007

Keep it moving

The Pilobolus troupe was named after a common barnyard fungus whose spores accelerate from 0-40 mph in the first millimeter of flight.
The ever-evolving Pilobolus
By JOHNETTE RODRIGUEZ  |  September 25, 2007

Maggots ate my flesh!

If you met Dana — attractive, athletic, and tan, somewhere in her 30s — you’d never guess her secret.
As antibiotics increasingly lose their potency, medical professionals are turning to (yecch!) fly larvae to take a bite out of wound recovery
By AUDREY SCHULMAN  |  July 16, 2007

Wet, hot American summer

On June 2, 2106, it’s hot.
What Boston will be like in 2106 if we do nothing to stop global warming
By MIKE MILIARD  |  June 02, 2006