Medical Technology

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Review: Solitary Man

By the fourth time Michael Douglas wakes up hungover and shirtless on a sour double bed, we get it: he's old.
Let's just move on
By PETER KEOUGH  |  June 11, 2010

They said what?

GOP leaders have a reputation for shunning science in favor of politics: on stem-cell research, evolution, and of course, climate change. As the global-warming battle heats up, so has their often-nonsensical rhetoric.
Republican lawmakers sound off on global warming
By DAVID S. BERNSTEIN  |  May 08, 2009

Inside looking out

Visiting Elizabeth King's "The Sizes of Things In the Mind's Eye" at Brown University's Bell Gallery (64 College Street, Providence, through December 21) is a bit like visiting Dr. Frankenstein's lab — all glass eyes, artificial limbs, and automatons.
Elizabeth King shares her mind's eye
By GREG COOK  |  December 03, 2008

The gulf of Maine

With a massively unpopular Republican president leaving office, this year’s Senate election is a contest based on a candidate’s alignment with Bush.  
Senator Collins votes the Bush line 77 percent of the time; her challenger, Representative Allen, weighs in at 18 percent. Will these numbers decide November’s election?
By JEFF INGLIS  |  October 09, 2008

Company man

In at least one of its toss-away scenes, Joshua Seftel’s War, Inc. rises to the level of brutal bad taste that distinguishes master satirists from Jonathan Swift to Stanley Kubrick.
War, Inc.  cuts its losses
By PETER KEOUGH  |  June 11, 2008


Rage against the machines!

We’re on the cusp of a perilous era. Our pitiful carbon bodies are evolving much slower than the silicon and steel gizmos we’re inventing. And the guys in the lab coats and pocket protectors are starting to worry we’ve opened Pandora’s hard drive.
Could robots take over the world? In many ways, they already have.
By MIKE MILIARD  |  May 21, 2008

Portland hopes to bridge cultural divides

This February marked the six-year anniversary of journalist Daniel Pearl’s horrifying death at the hands of Islamist extremists.
Open-door policy
By DEIRDRE FULTON  |  April 02, 2008

Protesting the bio-whatever

Eighteen dancers showed to prostest the BIO 2007 convention, but they were as fuzzy as their boas on a lot of details.
A week of biotech protests ends, not with a bang but with battery failure
By MARGARET DORIS  |  May 18, 2007

Round-trip Cruz

Volver may be a rich and moving film that celebrates the triumph of the feminine spirit, but it’s already best known as the movie in which writer/director Pedro Almodóvar fitted willowy leading lady Penélope Cruz with an ample prosthetic ass. Watch t
Pedro Almodóvar’s Volver
By GARY SUSMAN  |  February 20, 2007

Sell your body, or sell your soul?

Desperation had driven me to this point. I was determined not to return to the soul-eating life of a cubicle serf, so, unemployed and grasping for tuition money, I’d become a Craigslist whore, selling my services to slick marketers wielding surveys and h
30 nights as a (well-paid) guinea pig in hospital sleep study
By I-HSIEN SHERWOOD  |  January 25, 2007


Snowe’s tracks

Believe the hype — US Senator Olympia Snowe’s key votes in 2005 and 2006 do, indeed, straddle party lines. Whether you like that or not depends on which issues get to you. Blown away: Jean Hay Bright's fight to topple a political icon. By Sara Donnell
How moderate is Maine’s senior senator?
By SARA DONNELLY  |  October 18, 2006

Independent man

Congress gets about a 30 percent approval rating from the public -- recently down to 25 percent.
A letter from Rod Driver, Richmond  Independent candidate for Congress

Last of the Tuba

In a 2006 performance in the Boboli Gardens in Florence, Italy, MaryPat Warming wore a costume with a third prosthetic breast, stood with the Madonna’s poise at the edge of a wall with the vista of Florence unfolding behind her, and endeavored to consume
MaryPat Warming’s burial of feminist theory
By CHRIS THOMPSON  |  October 11, 2006

Langevin plays to the middle in seeking fourth term

When President George W. Bush last month used his first presidential veto to reject legislation on embryonic stem cell research, US Representative James R. Langevin again found himself in the spotlight.
Talking politics  
By IAN DONNIS  |  August 09, 2006

The call of the future

As technology advances over the next two decades, cell phones will morph into new shapes and assume new features.
How the cell phone will go swiss army
By BOB PARKS AND JAMES P. MCQUOID  |  April 25, 2006


Med school drug pushers

You may have heard of a little ongoing row about a Merck drug called Vioxx, which was pulled from the market in 2004 due to evidence that it caused serious heart problems in some users.
How scientists are selling out to drug companies
By DAVID S. BERNSTEIN  |  April 12, 2006

O Heroi | The Hero

No veteran demobbed after wartime has it easy, but the case of Vitório is downright Homeric.
3.0 stars
By PETER KEOUGH  |  February 09, 2006

I Am Iron Man (Sorta)

Princeton, you can keep your Batman. (Frankly, his costume could use a little work, anyway.)
MIT’s most famous fictional alum, Tony Stark, has some real-life rivals
By ALEXIS HAUK  |  January 01, 1900