Martin McDonagh

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Sour and dour souls

Some people are brittle and dry as tinder, but they don't have the sense to not play with matches. The two women at the dangerous center of Martin McDonagh's The Beauty Queen of Leenane could blaze up at any moment, and we know that one or both will
The Gamm's 'Beauty Queen of Leenane'
By BILL RODRIGUEZ  |  May 10, 2013

Review: Seven Psychopaths

As in his debut In Bruges , Martin McDonagh here plays self-reflexive games while undermining the gangster genre.

By PETER KEOUGH  |  October 12, 2012

Whack Jobs

Unlike his debut feature, In Bruges, the title of prolific playwright and filmmaker Martin McDonagh's hilarious, ingenious, and sneakily profound second movie, Seven Psychopaths , gives you a good idea of what you're in for.
Martin McDonagh’s second film, Seven Psychopaths
By PETER KEOUGH  |  September 21, 2012

Providence College’s Cripple of Inishmaan

Martin McDonagh's The Cripple of Inishmaan , the last of his Aran Islands trilogy, is being served very well by the actors at Providence College Theatre (through November 6). You could say without heated opposition that they are doing a better job than
Urge for going
By BILL RODRIGUEZ  |  November 04, 2011

Mad Horse gets vicious with McDonagh shock-fest

You can't say that Padraic (Dave Currier) is a man without a heart.
Don't forget the guns
By MEGAN GRUMBLING  |  October 14, 2011

Review: The Druid’s fine trip to Inishmaan

Although Martin McDonagh’s The Cripple of Inishmaan is the least likely of his plays to provoke a riot, as John Millington Synge’s The Playboy of the Western World did at its 1907 Dublin premiere, it is the most Synge-like of the Anglo-Irish dramatis
Cripple kicking
By CAROLYN CLAY  |  February 04, 2011

Review: Lieutenant of Inishmore is the cat’s me-oww!

Hysterical laughter — of both the pathological and the funny sort — has its place as stopgap comfort when things seemingly can't get worse. Written in 2001 and set in 1993, Martin McDonagh's The Lieutenant of Inishmore treats the terrorist Troubles in
Gore and guffaws
By BILL RODRIGUEZ  |  January 14, 2011

The games people play

Who’s afraid of Edward Albee?
Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?; The Caretaker; Little Black Dress
By CAROLYN CLAY  |  October 09, 2009

Play by play: July 17, 2009

Boston's theater schedule
Plays from A to Z
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  July 17, 2009
lady list

Lady of the Sea

If all you know of the Aran Islands is the plays of Martin McDonagh, you probably think their populace is an untamed and violent lot.
If all you know of the Aran Islands is the plays of Martin McDonagh, you probably think their populace is an untamed and violent lot.
By CAROLYN CLAY  |  May 15, 2009

Odd couples

The East Hampton Board of Health would doubtless approve Grey Gardens: The Musical , since it comes minus the crapping cats, feral raccoons, and piles of garbage that form the supporting cast and unsanitary milieu of the famed documentary on which it's
The Lyric's Grey Gardens; Trinity's Shapeshifter
By CAROLYN CLAY  |  May 15, 2009

Play by Play: March 13, 2009

A compilation of theater productions in and around Boston
Plays A to Z
By CAROLYN CLAY  |  March 10, 2009

Death and transfiguration

There are some playwrights whose work makes you think that a night at the theater is going to be an eat-your-vegetables affair, but then you see a sharp production of one of their plays and you realize the menu is meatier than you had remembered.
Fugard at New Rep, plus Spalding Gray , Conor McDermottroe, and The Random Caruso
By ED SIEGEL  |  March 03, 2009

Blackbird at SpeakEasy

The year 2007 was a banner one for British theater.
A play about a confrontation between two desperate nobodies.
By ED SIEGEL  |  February 25, 2009

New and old

First, a tribute to a few of the year's newer theater ventures.
The best of 2008's theater productions
By BY MEGAN GRUMBLING  |  December 23, 2008

Right on target

Under Tony Reilly’s direction, the American Irish Repertory Ensemble makes rich, wicked, and poignant work of the brothers’ murderous one-upmanship.
AIRE’s Lonesome West hits home
By MEGAN GRUMBLING  |  November 05, 2008


Rough justice

Except that it's a black farce, not a tragedy, you could call The Lieutenant of Inishmore Martin McDonagh's Titus Andronicus .
The Lieutenant of Inishmore; How Many Miles to Basra?; Legally Blonde the Musical
By CAROLYN CLAY  |  November 04, 2008

Morality plays

The next six weeks of American life will be marked by a theatrical onslaught of ambition, contention, and colorful character development.
It’s hard to escape politics this fall
By MEGAN GRUMBLING  |  September 10, 2008

Fall on the boards

There are tours to the former Czechoslovakia, Romania, Italy, Iraq, the Aran Islands, and even the Underworld on area stages this fall.
From A Chorus Line to Tennessee Williams and the Grinch
By CAROLYN CLAY  |  September 08, 2008


“Once upon a time” is how it starts. Upon this Michal insists.
Not just telling stories
By MEGAN GRUMBLING  |  February 13, 2008

Mediæval morality play

It’s location, location, location for Martin McDonagh.
In Bruges   is a good place to be
By CAROLYN CLAY  |  February 06, 2008


The art of violence

The most frightening thing about this play is the prospect that less than first-rate actors can perform it, skating upon its sensationalism rather than sinking into its depths.
Gamm’s Pillowman is unsettling
By BILL RODRIGUEZ  |  February 05, 2008

Darkness in lights

The coming cold season of theater looks to veer toward darkness, crime, acrimony, and/or moral and sexual ambiguity — excellent news!
Preview 2008: the winter of malcontents
By MEGAN GRUMBLING  |  December 26, 2007

Out of Ireland

You hardly know whether to exude an exculpatory tear or a banshee scream this week.
A Night in November ; By the Bog of Cats
By CAROLYN CLAY  |  October 18, 2006

Players and painted stage

It seems the fall theater season was shot from a gun this year, barely after the Labor Day picnic baskets had been packed away.
Fall on the Boston boards  
By CAROLYN CLAY  |  September 13, 2006

Freedom fighters

Anglo-Irish playwright Martin McDonagh’s The Pillowman, which is getting its area premiere at New Repertory Theatre (at the Arsenal Center for the Arts through October 1), is a superficially clever play.
The Pillowman at New Rep; 1776 at Lyric Stage
By STEVE VINEBERG  |  September 12, 2006


Romance gone wrong

An unrequited-love triangle is at the center of Adam Rapp’s riveting and abrasive if not entirely plausible Red Light Winter.
Red Light Winter in Wellfleet; Romeo and Juliet in Williamstown
By CAROLYN CLAY  |  August 09, 2006

Bruised brothers

The culmination of a grim trilogy from Martin McDonagh, the bad boy of modern Irish theater.
Passion at play in The Lonesome West
By BILL RODRIGUEZ  |  February 01, 2006

Money counts

Your superior correspondents are as guilty as most for ignoring the many legitimate candidates who seek office, but are not given much chance of winning because of their reluctance (or inability) to link up with deep-pocketed contributors.
Sheeler has a gripe about attention given to better-funded rivals
By  |  January 19, 2006