Marcel Duchamp

Latest Articles


Notes from the New York Underground

When I last saw Ms. Phoebe Legere, she was smiling and waving goodbye from the backstage area of the Met, where she'd opened for my band the Young Adults.
All Phoebe, all the time; "An Orgy of Corporate Gluttony" at the ProJo
By RUDY CHEEKS  |  June 10, 2011

Theme and variations

George Balanchine was famous for “non-story” ballets, but when you put three of his works — the usual number to fill up an evening — together, you always get some kind of narrative.
Boston Ballet’s ‘Ultimate Balanchine’
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  May 14, 2010

A walk on the wild side

Everyone looks so weary in Howard Yezerski Gallery's gritty documentary photos of Boston's dear departed Combat Zone from 1969 to 1978. The year's still young, but this glimpse into our past from Roswell Angier, Jerry Berndt, and John Goodman may be one
The Combat Zone, plus burlesque, drag, cross-dressing, and the avant-garde
By GREG COOK  |  February 19, 2010

Fresh fruit and vegetables

The bleakest months of New England winter are ahead of us, so the prospect of leaving your toasty house to see art may not be at the top of your to-do list.
A winter crop of art
By GREG COOK  |  January 01, 2010

Make a run for the border

In August 1923, photographer Edward Weston left his wife and three of his four sons in Los Angeles and headed to Mexico City.
Edward Weston in Mexico, plus modern Mexican prints
By GREG COOK  |  June 05, 2009

The Big Hurt: The year in not really giving a shit

In the annals of American pop history, 2008 will surely go down as a year when our nation had more-important shit to worry about than music.
Maybe next year, music
By DAVID THORPE  |  December 23, 2008


Political Andy?

Was Andy Warhol more politically engaged than he's given credit for?
Warhol's court-painter years; plus doodling at the Rose
By GREG COOK  |  November 04, 2008

A real cut-up

Robert Pollard is a Renaissance man.
An interview with Robert Pollard on the occasion of the landing of Boston Spaceships
By MIKE MILIARD  |  September 23, 2008

Real to reel

Even now, after Greil Marcus’s Lipstick Traces and Simon Reynolds’s Rip It Up and Start Again , the rock-star-as-vector-of-ideas is still something of a challenge for us.
The exquisite artifice and lasting weirdoid-ness of Roxy Music
By JAMES PARKER  |  April 01, 2008

They’ve got issues

As newspapers and magazines slim and shift their focus to online content and revenue streams, it has become sadly commonplace to overlook the unique capabilities of periodically printed matter.
The bookworm’s gift that keeps on giving
By CHRISTOPHER GRAY  |  December 12, 2007

Art retains its power to push our buttons

When a French artist submitted a signed urinal to the Society of Independent Artists, some might think that this was just another battlefront in the culture wars.
Action speaks!
By IAN DONNIS  |  October 17, 2007


Fact and friction

As it happened, at the end, the parrot wouldn’t say a word.
Aaron T. Stephan at Whitney Art Works
By CHRIS THOMPSON  |  August 01, 2007

Putting the ‘art’ in ‘fart’

Everybody poops.
‘Pull My Finger’ explores the dark vortex where comedy and poop jokes meet
By SHARON STEEL  |  July 06, 2007

Sifting the trash heap

There’s an image in an old Warlock comic book by Jim Starlin that sums up a lot of the peculiar, shared pleasure of reading comics.
Things I love about the gold and the garbage in comics
By DOUGLAS WOLK  |  June 28, 2007

Somewhere in time

As we sip sherry, Mr. Salley points to a picture of Cinderella’s castle at Disneyland, that glorious patamechanical nexus.
A senses-filling visit to the Musée Patamécanique
By BILL RODRIGUEZ  |  May 18, 2007

Thinking inside the box

Joseph Cornell was the quintessential odd duck.
Joseph Cornell in Salem
By GREG COOK  |  April 24, 2007


What? Institutional? Us?

George Maciunas was the sort of artist who composed musical scores that called for hammering nails into all the keys of a piano.
Fluxus gets the Harvard treatment
By GREG COOK  |  March 20, 2007

Looking back

The advantage of being a teaching museum is on full display at the Rhode Island School of Design in the exhibition “Re-Viewing the Twentieth Century.”
A “Re-View” of the last 100 years at RISD
By BILL RODRIGUEZ  |  January 02, 2007

Holiday, it would be so nice!

The Museum of Fine Arts offers a full-out festive immersion approach to the impending holidays this year — a line of attack that, in keeping with the contemporary spirit of art, embraces performing arts, multimedia, and site-specific.
Seasonal cheer at the MFA and the SMFA, Helen Molesworth at the Carpenter Center, Andrea Modica at BU
By RANDI HOPKINS  |  November 28, 2006

Mauve drab

The diptych is a device you almost never see used properly these days.
Henry Wolyniec + Melanie Essex at Whitney Art Works
By CHRIS THOMPSON  |  August 17, 2006

Cracking the code

The idea that the viewer contributes to a work of art doesn’t seem as visionary as it did in the early 20th century when the Berlin and New York schools of Dada were hammering out new ways of seeing and expressing.
Ubu’s cryptographers are on the case
By IAN PAIGE  |  July 26, 2006


Exhibition expedition

Here are 10 exhibits across New England that will keep you happily inside all summer. Summer Guide 2006: Cheap thrills from Bar Harbor to New Haven.
A road trip to sample great art is worth the gas money
By GREG COOK  |  June 14, 2006

A fresh look

No one would argue that Joseph Beuys (1921-1986) was not one of the most influential artist in the second half of the 20th century, if not the most.
"Another View of Joseph Beuys" at Brown  
By BILL RODRIGUEZ  |  February 15, 2006

Facets of brilliance

The current show in the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum’s special-exhibition room, “Bellini and the East,” is another flickering jewel in the Gardner’s crown.
Bellini at the Gardner, Cubism at the MFA
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  January 12, 2006