Louis Armstrong

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Mixed Magic’s When Mahalia Sings

Mahalia Jackson was more than a celebrity before her death in 1972.
Amazing grace
By BILL RODRIGUEZ  |  June 29, 2012

Sweet inspiration

For more than three decades, until her death in 1972, Mahalia Jackson’s powerful contralto voice raised the spirits of even nonbelievers through her inspiring gospel singing. In an original production, Mixed Magic Theatre is reminding us about her legacy
Mixed Magic’s When Mahalia Sings
By BILL RODRIGUEZ  |  April 09, 2010

Midnight ramblers

In rock ’n’ roll, it was possible to live in Harvard Square, be a musician — a local musician — and be able to pay your rent and find restaurants where you could eat and buy food and survive, and feel that there was a sense of . . . future, with hope and
Rock legend Peter Wolf serves dinner and verse to the Phoenix ’s poet .
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  April 09, 2010

Easy does it

Writer/producer Eric Overmyer was quoted in a New York Times Magazine article last month, but it’s worth repeating: “ Treme is not the The Wire .” He went on: “Those who are expecting The Wire or wanting The Wire may be frustrated.”
Treme tours New Orleans
By JON GARELICK  |  April 09, 2010


It is May 1966, in the Prelude Club in Harlem, an Atlantic Records release party.
The Worcester Art Museum shows us ‘Who Shot Rock & Roll’
By GREG COOK  |  March 26, 2010

Making it sing

If you come to Dee Dee Bridgewater’s new Billie Holiday tribute disc — or to her two Holiday shows at the Paramount Theatre this weekend — expecting a reverent impersonation, you could be in for a shock. Bridgewater has transformed the music and persona
Dee Dee does Billie, plus John Stein & Ron Gill
By JON GARELICK  |  March 26, 2010


The Regal Beagle

The Regal Beagle is making a quick success doing what almost all the new restaurants want to do: small plates; comfort food with a gourmet twist; a mixture of high and low; a bit of locovore, green, and slow fare; some salty fast food; interesting drinks
A quirky neighborhood that puts all the pieces together
By ROBERT NADEAU  |  January 15, 2010

Getting the story

Full-length written histories of jazz can be a slog. Especially since "the story of jazz" (as critic Marshall Stearns titled his 1956 tome) only gets longer and more complicated. Personally, on these prose-narrative trips along the New Orleans–New York
Gary Giddins and Scott DeVeaux sing jazz's many strains
By JON GARELICK  |  December 04, 2009

Stars aligned

The days are growing shorter, the magazines are (well, barely) getting larger and meatier, and the first batch of cider doughnuts is on the way real soon: all sure signs of autumn, as is the bountiful crop of prestigious concerts coming our way this se
Cult heroes and superstars dot the region's fall concert calendar
By CHRISTOPHER GRAY  |  September 18, 2009

Love is nothing

Here’s what I know about tennis: if you’ve got love, you’ve got nothing. From love to 15 to 30 to whatever comes between 30 and the sets and the matches, with those advantage points and tiebreakers thrown in, tennis scoring is less intuitive to me than t
Balls, Pucks, and Monster Trucks
By RICK WORMWOOD  |  September 11, 2009
wein list

The music man

Forty years after a half-million hippies descended on a sprawling dairy farm in upstate New York, Woodstock has become shorthand for an entire epoch.
George Wein, the father of American music festivals, reflects on bringing world-class folk and jazz (and more) to Newport
By DAVID SCHARFENBERG  |  August 07, 2009


Hot summer nights

If the coming week is indicative of anything, it's that this is going to be one busy summer. Discs have been flooding into the office and there's no end in sight. In an effort to keep up, here's a collection of four reviews for albums being released be
Before the solstice hits, four albums drop
By SAM PFEIFLE  |  June 12, 2009

Tours of duty

Clifford and Bang will celebrate Memorial Day weekend together at Highland Kitchen in Somerville this Sunday in a program called "Basic Training: An Evening of Art, Music, and Poetry."
John Clifford and Billy Bang's Vietnam; plus Icons Among Us and bye-bye Jazz Brunch
By JON GARELICK  |  May 22, 2009

Griot act

Some albums are extraordinary because they capture their time. Others are great because they transcend it.
Rokia Traoré breaks through with Tchamantché
By TED DROZDOWSKI  |  February 09, 2009

Crossword: ''Court case''

Time to mix and match
By MATT JONES  |  November 19, 2008

Back to the future

Since leaving Roomful of Blues, the vintage guitar hero Duke Robillard has moved forward by reaching back into the annals of American blues, swing, jazz, and R&B and by doing so, he’s told a pretty incredible story.
Duke Robillard unveils Sunny and Her Joy Boys
By BOB GULLA  |  October 22, 2008


State of the art

You could find just about any kind of jazz you wanted on the three stages at the JVC Jazz Festival in Newport last weekend.
Newport's Jazz ID check
By JON GARELICK  |  August 12, 2008

Hot summer nights

The annual Sound Session festival is a weeklong sonic soiree that is expected to draw upwards of 65,000 partygoers from July 6 through 12.
The pulsating spirit of Sound Session ’08
By CHRIS CONTI  |  June 24, 2008

Walking the line

Duke Robillard comes out Swingin’.
Duke Robillard comes out Swingin’
By BOB GULLA  |  May 28, 2008

Crescent City health report

“Is much better! The tourists is coming back !” That was our cab driver from Louis Armstrong Airport into New Orleans — a transplanted Haitian from Jefferson Parish.
The New Orleans Jazz + Heritage Festival buoys a wounded community
By JON GARELICK  |  May 06, 2008

Horn of plenty

The Tinge , Al Basile’s sixth album and the follow-up to his 2006 set Groovin’ In the Mood Room , proves once and for all that Basile is a bard of the blues.
Al Basile is still groovin’ on The Tinge
By BOB GULLA  |  March 12, 2008



As soon as you think you’ve got Catherine Russell figured out, she lobs another detail your way that throws the whole thing off.
Catherine Russell’s rich musical path
By JEFF TAMARKIN  |  February 26, 2008

The long view

Bob Blumenthal’s first book is out, and the wonder is that we didn’t get it sooner.
Bob Blumenthal’s history of jazz
By JON GARELICK  |  January 29, 2008

New Times editor, Ben Dover

This is the disgraceful hiring of a political operative, not a journalist.
Kristol’s op-ed addition marks a sellout to the neocon cabal
By PHILLIPE AND JORGE  |  January 16, 2008

Bob Enos, 1947-2008

“He could always hit those high notes,” said Roomful’s former bandleader Greg Piccolo.
Remembering one of a kind
By MARC LIPKIN  |  January 16, 2008

Scene and heard

Entertainment companies are pumping out music DVD titles by the hundreds, and 2008 will see a deluge of releases across all genres.
The year ahead in DVDs
By JEFF TAMARKIN  |  December 31, 2007


The old neighborhood

Some call Charles “Teenie” Harris’s five decades of photos of Pittsburgh one of the grandest chronicles of African-American life ever assembled.
Charles ‘Teenie’ Harris at Gallery Kayafas, plus videos at MIT
By GREG COOK  |  December 12, 2007

In action

In the era of YouTube, we’re apt to forget that not every note of music ever played has been captured on film or video.
The ‘Jazz Icons’ DVDs
By JEFF TAMARKIN  |  November 26, 2007

Prime time

To many political conservatives during Vietnam, championing the music of Bob Dylan, Pete Seeger, and Joni Mitchell was the equivalent of French-kissing Chairman Mao.
Heeere’s . . . Johnny Cash!
By TED DROZDOWSKI  |  October 23, 2007

Anat, Elvis, and Jenny

In the wake of a single solo album on her own label in 2005, Anat Cohen is suddenly everywhere.
Looking ahead to Newport Jazz and Folk, and to Jenny Scheinman
By JON GARELICK  |  July 30, 2007