Latest Articles


Review: Lincoln

Shot in sepia tints, with detailed period sets and ornate facial hair, the tableaux vivants that constitute Steven Spielberg's wry hagiography resemble Mathew Brady daguerreotypes, and are about as lively.
Lincoln logged
By PETER KEOUGH  |  November 09, 2012

Review: The Loneliest Planet

Nica (Hani Furstenberg) and Alex (Gael García Bernal) are fit and fearless adventurers backpacking through Georgia's Caucasus Mountains until a split-second lapse of judgment calls everything they took for granted into question.

By ANN LEWINSON  |  November 02, 2012

Review: Holy Motors

Rivaling The Master in the weirdness of its opening scene, Leos Carax's first film since Pola X (1999) begins with a long take of an audience staring out at the audience watching the movie.
Dream machine
By PETER KEOUGH  |  November 02, 2012

Review: The Other Son

It's a far-fetched premise: two boys mixed up at birth, a Palestinian raised by an Israeli-army colonel and his French wife in Tel Aviv, a Jew brought up by a West Bank Muslim family who have had a son killed in the occupation.

By GERALD PEARY  |  October 26, 2012

Review: War of the Buttons

Based upon Louis Pergaud's beloved and much adapted 1912 novel, this retread by Christophe Barratier ( Paris 36 ) is flawed but has its charms.

By PEG ALOI  |  October 26, 2012
short take_dreamteam

Review: The Other Dream Team

American audiences will be delighted to see how the Grateful Dead helped pay for the 1992 Lithuanian Olympic team, including supplying tie-dyed T-shirts. But only Lithuanians will thrill to the movie's climax...

By GERALD PEARY  |  October 12, 2012


Review: Trishna

If nothing else, Michael Winterbottom's updating of Tess of the D'Urbervilles to present-day India proves that Thomas Hardy will depress you no matter what the setting.
Tess of the D'Urbervilles set in present-day India
By PETER KEOUGH  |  July 20, 2012
Film: Where Do We Go Now?

Review: Where Do We Go Now?

Lebanese director Nadine Labaki's whimsical film about internecine slaughter has a tone problem from the very start: a group of widows engage in a goofy line dance while the voiceover narrator bewails the death toll of religious warfare.
Nadine Labaki's whimsical film
By PETER KEOUGH  |  May 25, 2012

As MIT expands eastward, Cambridge officials struggle to balance the allure of tech development with Central Square's gritty soul

A decade from now, the east end of Central Square will look nothing like the west.
Square roots
By EUGENIA WILLIAMSON  |  March 09, 2012
Review: Forgiveness of Blood

Review: The Forgiveness of Blood

American filmmaker Joshua Marston ( Maria Full of Grace ) traveled to Albania to write and direct this thoughtful, subtle feature about the victims of a blood feud, with an all-Albanian ensemble.
Joshua Marston's thoughtful, subtle feature
By GERALD PEARY  |  March 09, 2012
Chico and Rita shorttakes

Review: Chico & Rita

This is the first animated movie nominated in that category to show pubic hair, and as a film for grown-ups it outclasses most of the nominees for Best Picture.
An animated film for grown-ups
By PETER KEOUGH  |  March 02, 2012

Review - A Separation

Review: A Separation

Somehow, despite an increasingly repressive regime that has jailed many prominent filmmakers, including the world renowned auteur Jafar Panahi, Iranian cinema continues to produce some of the world's subtlest and most illuminating films about the relati
Family drama
By PETER KEOUGH  |  January 27, 2012
Short Take: Into the Abyss

Review: Into the Abyss

From the abyss of time in Cave of Forgotten Dreams , Werner Herzog turns to the abyss of capital punishment in today's America.
Werner Herzog turns to the abyss of capital punishment
By PETER KEOUGH  |  November 11, 2011
the mill and the cross 2

Review: The Mill and the Cross

Clever CGI allows the effective recreation of a 16th century Flanders.
Conceptually confusing
By GERALD PEARY  |  October 21, 2011
margin call short takes

Review: Margin Call

The financial crisis of 2008 awaits its Social Network; until then we have Margin Call, which zaps its credibility from the get-go when a downsized risk analyst (Stanley Tucci) openly passes a flash drive to an underling (Zachary Quinto) as he's escorte
Dumbed down
By ANN LEWINSON  |  October 21, 2011
love crime 3

Review: Love Crime

Love Crime deconstructs the genre by showing how to put together a mystery in order to deceive and manipulate those who would try to take it apart.
A deconstruction of the mystery genre
By PETER KEOUGH  |  October 07, 2011

short takes tucker and dale

Review: Tucker & Dale vs. Evil

From Deliverance to the new Straw Dogs , elitist Hollywood hasn't shown rednecks any respect.
Eli Craig's morality tale
By PETER KEOUGH  |  September 30, 2011
My Afternoons with...

Review: My Afternoons with Margueritte

European cinema doesn't have as many sure-fire formulas as Hollywood, but the one described, I think, by Pauline Kael as the "lonely child, clean old man" scenario has long endured.
Twisting the "lonely child, clean old man" formula
By PETER KEOUGH  |  September 23, 2011


Purple's prose makes for wrenching melodrama
Purple's prose makes for wrenching melodrama
By PETER KEOUGH  |  November 20, 2009

Books tour

While most area colleges continue to offer predictably boring campus tours that amount to wandering through academic ghost towns imagining departed crowds, there are also some alternatives to the standard walk-and-talk routine.
A guide to unofficial campus visits
By JULIA RAPPAPORT  |  May 01, 2009

Union electrical workers decry biotech greed

When young nerds were told that they would one day boss around guys who pummeled them in grade school, consoling parents and teachers should also have warned their prodigies about labor unions.
Conflict between the Massachusetts Biotechnology Council and the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers.
By CHRIS FARAONE  |  March 04, 2009


Underground art

Next time a smirking subway conductor cackles wickedly while closing the folding doors in your face, don’t get angry.
Reviewing the MBTA’s subterranean aesthetic
By MIKE MILIARD  |  April 30, 2008

When inadvertent lite-brite terrorists attack

The following is a rough timeline of the events, which led Boston police and city officials to hunt down Aqua Teen Hunger Force mooninite displays, believing, at first, that they were bombs, then suspecting that the ads were part of an elaborate terror
The events as they've happened
By VANESSA CZARNECKI  |  February 01, 2007

Kristin Hersh’s family affair

It’s a family affair. Really.
Throwing Muses, 50 Foot Wave, and Bullseye
By JIM SULLIVAN  |  August 15, 2006

Boston music news: August 11, 2006

Greg “Skeggy” Kendall is best known in town for his music, both playing it and promoting it. Bullseye, "Duck Taped Shut" (mp3) Aberdeen City, "God Is Going to Get Sick of Me" (mp3)
Notes on Bullseye and Aberdeen City
By JIM SULLIVAN  |  August 08, 2006

The politics of songwriting

It’s a windy Saturday afternoon in February and already a long line has formed in front of Axis.
State Radio and Josh Ritter
By MATT ASHARE  |  April 28, 2006