James Frey

Latest Articles


No country for old men

Louis de Rougemont makes James Frey look like a documentarian. A sickly Victorian lad who arose from his cot, knocked around the Southern Hemisphere for a while, and returned to England with a hifalutin new moniker and captivating tales of seafaring per
Shipwrecked! at the Lyric; Heroes in Lowell
By CAROLYN CLAY  |  December 04, 2009

Hard times

"You just shit yourself — every muscle, every joint aches. Your entire body cries for heroin. Just one bag of heroin, you know that's all you need, and you'll feel better."
A former junkie looks back at tough days in Lowell
By MIKE MILIARD  |  June 12, 2009

Me and my tattoos

I know that most people get their first tattoo when they’re drunk, or infatuated, or when there’s a race war on their cellblock and they have to quickly join a gang — but not me.
One Man’s Inky Voyage Toward Meaning
By JAMES PARKER  |  July 23, 2008

Who gives a truth?

Both authors write largely about issues of addiction and abuse, but they couldn’t have more different styles.
Augusten Burroughs and James Frey try to overcome authenticity scandals with grim new books
By CHRISTOPHER GRAY  |  May 28, 2008

Pants afire

The ratio of falsehood to truth in the universe has not, of course, altered one jot since the world began.
Fakeries and the faking fakers who fake them
By JAMES PARKER  |  March 13, 2008

Making book

This spring brings exciting story collections from established authors and hot newcomers.
Spring Arts Preview: Fiction, non-fiction, and poetry
By BARBARA HOFFERT  |  March 10, 2008


Can Britney rise again?

The first movie star was a woman named Florence Lawrence.
It’s tough to be a celebrity on the skids, but even a ‘ticking time-bomb’ can stage a convincing comeback
By SHARON STEEL  |  October 18, 2007


David Sedaris, laughing gnome of NPR and bestselling humorist, may — in the course of trying to be funny — have made a few things up.
Sedaris busted for unreal humor, apathetic Oxycontin addict discovered in California!
By JAMES PARKER  |  March 20, 2007

Life, examined

Solo performer Mike Daisey has been described as a cross between Noam Chomsky and Jack Black, Spalding Gray and Robin Williams and — my favorite — “Jackie Gleason meets Franz Kafka.”
Delving deeper with Mike Daisey
By BILL RODRIGUEZ  |  September 26, 2006

Listing forward

Like anyone who works a specific beat — sportswriters and political writers come to mind — media critics acquire lots of impressions, opinions, and stray observations that never actually make it into print, and yet they are worth musing over.
Sometimes a media critic just wants to herd a few cats
By MARK JURKOWITZ  |  May 03, 2006


The disappointing thing about Henry Rollins — otherwise a paragon of American manhood — has always been the fact that he is, in public at least, a Moz basher.
The singular brilliance of Morrissey  
By JAMES PARKER  |  March 27, 2006


Howie Carr blows up

It’s Friday, and Howie Carr Incorporated is in full flog for his new book, The Brothers Bulger (Warner Books).
As Whitey makes him famous, the Bulger -scribe doesn’t have to worry about facts
By DAVID BOERI  |  March 16, 2006

Brilliant or bullshit?

You’re on a subway in an unfamiliar city, and you don’t know how you got there or where you’re going.
The Difficulty of Proving Amnesia
By CHRIS FUJIWARA  |  March 15, 2006

Pop fundamentalism

I keep waiting for Madonna to have her James Frey moment.
Matisyahu and Madonna embrace a holy plan
By JOSH KUN  |  March 02, 2006

Phantom of the Oprah

Letters to the Boston editor: February 24, 2006
By EDITORIAL  |  February 23, 2006

From the ashes

Honest, perceptive, and keenly felt, The Good Life — the story of two couples’ furtive, hesitant stabs at happiness in the brave and fearful new world of post-9/11 New York — is McInerney’s most mature and affecting book yet.
Jay McInerney grows up
By MIKE MILIARD  |  February 22, 2006


Attack of the 50-foot Oprah

David Letterman is by no means the first one to realize that the road to success — or forgiveness — entails planting a kiss somewhere on Oprah’s oft-fluctuating anatomy.
Why America’s most powerful celebrity should be more feared than loved
By MARK JURKOWITZ  |  February 09, 2006

The trouble with the truth

I think I deserve considerable credit for not comparing Governor John Baldacci’s state-of-the-state address to the kind of memoir that wins an endorsement from Oprah’s book club.
Politics and other mistakes
By AL DIAMON  |  February 02, 2006

The awful truth

Not to be outdone by recent Beltway-corruption scandals, the ordinarily more-subdued literary world found itself two weeks ago grappling with its own grim little fraud.
Recent revelations about fictitious memoirs have exposed our society’s lust for stories about savaging helpless children  
By MICHAEL BRONSKI  |  January 25, 2006


If you are one of the more than 3.5 million readers (and climbing) who forked over $22.95 for James Frey’s autobiographical account of his addiction to booze and cocaine, and his subsequent recovery from the depths of spiritual squalor, you were robbed
The Smoking Gun shoots author James Frey, and bags Oprah and Doubleday in the process
By THE PHOENIX EDITORIAL  |  January 20, 2006