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Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

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Whitcomb's legacy

It is unlikely that James Whitcomb Riley, a turn-of-the-century poet for a short time considered the heir to Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, ever envisioned his work accompanied by music quite like this.
Feel the poetry rattling your bones
By SAM PFEIFLE  |  March 25, 2011
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The man in the yellow fur coat

The cultural critic Mark Dery worked as a clerk for Manhattan's Gotham Book Mart in the early '80s. One afternoon, he was taken by surprise.
As the Boston Athenaeum stages an Edward Gorey retrospective, his biographer reflects on the artist's lasting legacy
By EUGENIA WILLIAMSON  |  February 04, 2011
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Take a seat and consider the chair

Richard Prince's 2008 "Nurse Hat Chair" sits next to a gothic French "Joined Chair" in the first gallery of the extensive "Sit Down!" — book-ending the six centuries of chairs represented in the exhibit.
Form + function
By ANNIE LARMON  |  December 10, 2010
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Pimping his ride

This week, the Paul Revere Memorial Association and the Old South Meeting House kick off a free, month-long lecture series to take place at the latter.
History Dept.
By EUGENIA WILLIAMSON  |  September 03, 2010
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Grave Spotting

I asked the question this way: "Where would you want to be buried?" Not "do," but "would." That is to say if, by chance, you were to die, unlikely as that might be, where would you want to spend all of nonexistence?
Spooky? A bit, but Massachusetts's cemeteries are also the bucolic, final resting places of many great American writers.
By NINA MACLAUGHLIN  |  June 18, 2010
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Lincoln Yule log

Abraham Lincoln, as he said in his second inaugural address, yearned to "bind up the nation's wounds." Since the great man was assassinated little more than a month later, he didn't quite get around to it. No worry, Paula Vogel has taken over the job wi
The Huntington celebrates A Civil War Christmas
By CAROLYN CLAY  |  November 27, 2009


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Myth and legend

With no ado, here are some of the last year’s theatrical highlights.
Portland theatre: 2007 in review
By MEGAN GRUMBLING  |  December 19, 2007
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Capital loss

Two things stood out when the book tour for an impressive new anthology, The American Idea: The Best of the Atlantic Monthly , rolled through town this past month.

How has moving from Boston to Washington changed the Atlantic?


By ADAM REILLY  |  November 05, 2007
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On Portland’s poet

It’s a testament to much of what’s good about America that one of her first and most popular poets had such reverence, and such affection, for so many of her stories.
Celebrating Longfellow’s words
By MEGAN GRUMBLING  |  October 31, 2007

Nobody expects the Festival

Since its debut in1990, the Little Festival has been an opportunity for chosen playwrights to further develop their scripts with the feedback of actors, directors, and audience members.
The Portland Stage Company’s 18th annual Little Festival of the Unexpected
By MEGAN GRUMBLING  |  May 09, 2007
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City of the dead

Some are simple slabs, inscribed only with a name and two dates. Others are enormous and imposing: stylized Etruscan sarcophagi, sculpted Grecian urns.
Mount Auburn Cemetery looks back on 175 years — and ahead to an eternal future
By MIKE MILIARD  |  November 30, 2006


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Read all about it

Riding there red line from Central Square to Park Street recently, a friend of mine from Philadelphia surveyed the length of the train and said, “You don’t see this in Philly.”
Some of Boston’s best bars have a literary history
By NINA MACLAUGHLIN  |  September 01, 2006