Henry James

Latest Articles


Grave Spotting

I asked the question this way: "Where would you want to be buried?" Not "do," but "would." That is to say if, by chance, you were to die, unlikely as that might be, where would you want to spend all of nonexistence?
Spooky? A bit, but Massachusetts's cemeteries are also the bucolic, final resting places of many great American writers.
By NINA MACLAUGHLIN  |  June 18, 2010

Double trouble

Boston Lyric Opera's debut Opera Annex production was so good in so many ways, it's painful that one bad idea just about sank it.
BLO's The Turn of the S crew, Levine's Carter and Simon Boccanegra, Teatro Lirico, the Berlin Philharmonic Wind Quintet, and more
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  February 12, 2010

John Harbison plus 10

Classical music in Boston is so rich, having to pick 10 special events for this winter preview is more like one-tenth of the performances I'm actually looking forward to.
Picking from a packed concert schedule
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  January 01, 2010

Plain spoken

In American prose, there is a plain style, a child of the 20th century, descending from Hemingway and Cather. The best New Yorker writers — James Thurber, Joseph Mitchell, Janet Malcolm — have it.
Colm Tóibín's see-through prose
By WILLIAM CORBETT  |  June 19, 2009

Three's company

The show's American curator, Frederick Ilchman, has snagged an improbable number of pairs and trios from the world's famous (and not so famous) museums.
Titian, Tintoretto, and Veronese rule at the MFA
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  March 11, 2009

Max Ophüls at the Harvard Film Archive

Max at the Harvard Film Archive
Plaisir d’Ophüls
By STEVE VINEBERG  |  January 20, 2009


Unembarrassed riches

Some weeks Boston has such musical riches, one wouldn’t want to be anywhere else.
Dutoit and Elder at the BSO, Collage’s Berio, Boston Conservatory’s Turn of the Screw, and Kurt Weill at the Gardner and the MFA
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  February 21, 2008

Turn and face the strange

On Delia’s Web site, overly fast typist “Dptanimal” writes: “THE PERFECT WOMAM —– THE ONE YOU ARE IN LOVE WITH !!!”
What would you do to find the perfect mate?
By DEIRDRE FULTON  |  February 13, 2008

Innocents abroad?

Great symphony orchestras don’t just play at home.
The BSO prepares to go on tour
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  August 22, 2007

Dead white females

Can you remember the last time you curled up under the covers with Marcel Proust’s I n Search of Lost Time ?
From Fall Out Boy to One Night in Paris , modern pop culture is what it is today thanks to 10 long-expired ladies
By SHARON STEEL  |  August 08, 2007

Love and death

“Classic Balanchine” as opposed to . . . “Jazz Balanchine”? “Porno Balanchine”? What was the alternative?
Boston Ballet's "Classic Balanchine" has all the basics
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  May 09, 2007


Get your shoes on and walk about town

Confession: I’m a junkie for narrative.  
By CHRISTINA BEVILACQUA  |  April 04, 2007

Cinema belongs to him

For many backlashing film scholars and canonical cinéastes, most of the big players in the French New Wave — Truffaut, Chabrol, Rohmer, Resnais, etc. — have been, over time, at least a touch overrated, save two: Jean-Luc Godard and Jacques Rivette.
The je ne c’est quoi world of Jacques Rivette
By MICHAEL ATKINSON  |  January 03, 2007

Lyrical gangstas

In 1997, David Riley and four other Tenants Harbor poets decided to become what he calls “ambassadors for poetry in a prose-laden world.”
Tenants Harbor group pushes poetry
By MEGAN GRUMBLING  |  November 01, 2006

The girls of summer

Americans, Henry James wrote in 1867, “can pick and choose and assimilate and in short (æsthetically, etc.) claim our property wherever we find it.”
Frank Benson and Edmund Tarbell at the MFA and the Peabody Essex  
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  August 10, 2006

Where is the love?

Kelly Sherman spent this spring exploring the ways in which practical, logistical decisions of a wedding cause couples to confront and mediate family relationships.
Kelly Sherman’s wedding seating arrangements, ‘Whistler’s Mother’ at the MFA, and ‘The Din’ in the South End
By RANDI HOPKINS  |  June 14, 2006