Harold Bloom

Latest Articles


Disco ball

C-dust pinch-hits for fairy dust in The Donkey Show , Diane Paulus & Randy Weiner's disco-set riff on A Midsummer Night's Dream . Forget the juice of "a little western flower" with which fairy king Oberon and hench-sprite Puck mix up the libidos o
The Donkey Show gets its kicks at the ART
By CAROLYN CLAY  |  September 18, 2009

Fighting Rome

It takes chutzpah for a first-time playwright to get into the ring with Bertolt Brecht.
Two Men of Florence at the Huntington; Coriolanus at the Armory
By CAROLYN CLAY  |  March 17, 2009

Smart women, tough choices

Welcome back to the director’s chair, Tina Packer.
All’s Well in Lenox, Going to St. Ives via Gloucester
By CAROLYN CLAY  |  July 22, 2008

Channeling Shakespeare

Cardenio , an early-17th-century play in which Shakespeare may well have had a hand, has been MIA since its debut and will doubtless remain so.
Cardenio  at the ART; King John at ASP
By CAROLYN CLAY  |  May 19, 2008

Rough magic

The cupboards of Irish dramaturgy are crammed with ghosts.
Shining City at the Huntington; ASP’s The Tempest
By CAROLYN CLAY  |  March 18, 2008

Publish and Perish?

Professor Tal Ben-Shahar is a resident rock-star lecturer on Harvard’s campus.
Blogging Harvard courses could revolutionize open education — if its contributors aren’t expelled first
By SHARON STEEL  |  February 28, 2008


Defending the universally loathed

Forsaken entities deserve a second chance.
The Phoenix looks with loving eyes at some of the worst people, places, and things in the world — and gives them a big hug
By PHOENIX STAFF  |  January 14, 2008

Stage worthies

The roar of the greasepaint precedes that of the autumn wind this year.
Fall on the Boston boards
By CAROLYN CLAY  |  September 12, 2007

War, peace, and Robert Pinsky

Every few years, a fall publishing season emerges that should remind us that Boston could be the literary epicenter of America.
The season's fiction, non-fiction, and poetry
By JOHN FREEMAN  |  September 12, 2007


Critic Harold Bloom compares Cleopatra, more in her infinite vitality than in her “infinite variety,” to that Shakespearean life force Sir John Falstaff.
Antony and Cleopatra and A Midsummer Night’s Dream at S+C
By CAROLYN CLAY  |  August 15, 2007

Dead white females

Can you remember the last time you curled up under the covers with Marcel Proust’s I n Search of Lost Time ?
From Fall Out Boy to One Night in Paris , modern pop culture is what it is today thanks to 10 long-expired ladies
By SHARON STEEL  |  August 08, 2007

Wizard bits

Odds and ends on the occasion of the final book's release
By SHARON STEEL  |  July 18, 2007

Out on a limb

Actors’ Shakespeare Project handles Shakespeare’s biggest bloodbath without turning on a single spigot.
Titus Andronicus  from ASP; Syncopation at MRT
By CAROLYN CLAY  |  April 02, 2007

Tyrants’ tales

According to legend, Nero fiddled while Rome burned.
American Repertory Theatre’s Britannicus, Actors’ Shakespeare Project’s The Winter’s Tale
By CAROLYN CLAY  |  January 30, 2007

The Stones

This article originally appeared in the August 26, 1994 issue of the Boston Phoenix.
An essay on the older
By CAMILLE PAGLIA  |  November 16, 2006

Zone clone

The very thought of Ryan Landry doing The Twilight Zone is enough to bring a smile to the face.
Ryan Landry channels Rod Serling  
By ED SIEGEL  |  October 18, 2006


Sifting Shakespeare

“For the spirit searcheth all things, yea, the bottom of God’s secrets.” That quotation from the 1557 Geneva Bible’s First Corinthians is the unlikely foundation of Ron Rosenbaum’s The Shakespeare Wars .
Ron Rosenbaum on Bottom, bottomlessness, the Bard, and . . . Ron
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  September 19, 2006

Poetry in motion

The eyes have it in Love’s Labour’s Lost , in which ocular imagery duels with what Harold Bloom calls a “florabundance of language” in the arch arias of courtier Berowne, who sees himself writ large in the “pitch-ball” peepers of Rosaline.
Love’s Labour’s Lost , Island of Slaves
By CARLOYN CLAY  |  May 28, 2006

Love and war

Shakespeare might have subtitled All’s Well That Ends Well (presented by Actors’ Shakespeare Project at Cambridge Family YMCA Theater through May 14) Smart Women, Foolish Choices .
All’s Well That Ends Well ; The Man Who ; Boots on the Ground
By CAROLYN CLAY  |  April 25, 2006
Stephen King list photo

Magical Mystery Tour

A thoughtful tribute to the pulp classics of the 1940s and 50s, The Colorado Kid is just the latest installment in an increasingly diverse and interesting body of work written under the pseudonym Richard Bachman.
Stephen King does pulp
By BRENDAN HUGHES  |  January 13, 2006