bestnom1000x50

Film Noir

Latest Articles

movie_tristana

Review: Tristana

Though one was an atheist and the other a churchgoer, both Luis Buñuel and Alfred Hitchcock were obsessed with their Catholicism.
Papist plot
By GERALD PEARY  |  November 23, 2012
Review: Elena

Review: Elena(1)

Andrei Zvyagintsev's film, a Special Jury Prize winner at Cannes 2011, becomes more than a domestic melodrama: a grim, effective allegory of the daily whirl in Putinland.
Domestic servitude
By GERALD PEARY  |  June 01, 2012
GAMES_Phelps_list

Review: L.A. Noire

When a game comes saddled with as much hype as L.A. Noire , one is tempted to judge it by an unattainable standard.
Cold case
By MITCH KRPATA  |  May 27, 2011
1005_stieg_list

Stockholm syndrome

With its low crime rate and socialized everything, Sweden doesn’t seem very noirish compared with, say, LA. Then again, much of the country spends the entire winter without sunlight.
Stieg Larsson’s Girl is stinging Swedish noir
By PETER KEOUGH  |  May 28, 2010
0911_red_list

Review: Red Cliff

Hong Kong auteur John Woo hit commercial and artistic pay dirt in the US with Face/Off , his loopy Nicolas Cage/John Travolta neo-noir, but once he’d directed Tom Cruise in Mission: Impossible II , was there anywhere left to go?
John Woo returns east
By BRETT MICHEL  |  November 27, 2009
0911_sofia_list

Mixed media

Film noir has been a running theme in composer/pianist Ran Blake's work since the beginning of his career — his very first album, The Newest Sound Around (RCA, 1962), with singer Jeanne Lee, began with David Raskin's theme to Otto Preminger's Laura .
Ran Blake's Pawnbroker, Sofia Koutsovitis's pan-American roots
By JON GARELICK  |  November 20, 2009


0910_noir_list

Hardboiled hub

When I was growing up in Roslindale a few decades back — among tribes of ignorant, second-generation immigrant kids whose favorite words began with “f” and “n” and who liked to torture small animals and beat up small children before they moved on to thei
The city’s gritty, criminal underbelly has redefined the dark, artistic vision known as Boston noir
By PETER KEOUGH  |  October 23, 2009
090529_indemnity_list

Dark passage

The Production Code, Hollywood's notorious self-censorship program, was instituted by the Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of America in 1930, but it didn't go into effect till 1934, when it was administered by Joseph I. Breen.
Film noir and the Production Code at the MFA
By STEVE VINEBERG  |  May 29, 2009
085016_steam_list

Steam dream

The All-in-One Victorian PC is the perfect little black dress of computer modifications.
Steampunk bursts through its subculture roots to challenge our musical, fashion, design, and even political sensibilities
By SHARON STEEL  |  May 14, 2008
Redbelt1_list

Redbelt

Not quite a neo-noir, still less a martial-arts movie, David Mamet’s taut, dank drama has a foot in each camp.
Pleasingly nuts
By GRAHAM FULLER  |  May 07, 2008
edsleflist

Gods and monsters — and David Hasselhoff

The Museum of Fine Arts did big things with Napoleon and Edward Hopper, pictures of prostitutes graced the walls of Boston’s two biggest art museums, and all hell broke loose when the Mooninites invaded.
Art: 2007 in review
By GREG COOK  |  December 17, 2007


060915_film_list

Film noir or red meat?

On this, all agree: nobody in 1940s Hollywood consciously made “film noirs,” though that’s what we now call The Maltese Falcon , Double Indemnity , The Big Sleep , and other dark, cynical, crime melodramas.
And Ric Burns’s Warhol documentary
By GERALD PEARY  |  September 12, 2006