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Review: A Royal Affair

Chances are a movie about 18th-century Danish history might not be a grabber. But this one could have been, had director Nikolaj Arcel cut the length by about 15 minutes, injected some zest into the narrative, and perhaps done some recasting.

By PETER KEOUGH  |  November 16, 2012

Creating an all-local restaurant (mostly)

It has become almost second nature for area restaurants to use local ingredients and to establish working relationships with nearby farmers and fishermen.
Pushing the proximity limit
By AMY ANDERSON  |  June 22, 2012
Off the record: The Asteroids Galaxy Tour

The Asteroids Galaxy Tour | Out of Frequency

Getting a boost with songs from their 2009 debut, Fruit , featured in iPod and Heineken ads, and getting handpicked as concert openers by a then-still-functioning Amy Winehouse in their native Copenhagen, the Asteroids Galaxy Tour rode a lucky streak o
BMG Rights (2012)
By MICHAEL CHRISTOPHER  |  February 03, 2012
Happy, Happy...

Review: Happy, Happy

First time filmmaker Anne Sewitsky finds a compassionate way to tell a familiar tale of adultery, and she's helped immeasurably by a first-rate acting ensemble, especially the two superlative actresses, whom you could imagine cast in films of the late I
A familiar tale of adultery
By GERALD PEARY  |  September 23, 2011

Review: In a Better World

Black-and-white issues get grayer in the 2010 Best Foreign Language Oscar winner, Susanne Bier’s In a Better World.
In a better movie
By PETER KEOUGH  |  April 15, 2011

Sports Blotter: Dead Duck

The saga of the University of Oregon football team grows sadder and sadder.
Oregon's Masoli finally stalls out; plus, a World Cup ambush, and Florida strikes back
By MATT TAIBBI  |  June 25, 2010


Making waves

Rhode Island’s upstart National Public Radio affiliate, WRNI, aims to be nothing less than a major media player here. And in the space of just a couple of years, the station has taken some impressive first steps.
Can WRNI supplant the ProJo as the state’s news king?
By DAVID SCHARFENBERG  |  June 11, 2010

Minimalism and mementos

After 5 Traverse gallery closed in February, crackerjack curator Maya Allison, who was co-director there, lined up a handful of small independent projects and seemed like she might be on her way to starting her own operation before she landed a gig as cu
Jamey Morrill's sculptures and 'souvenirs' at Craftland
By GREG COOK  |  June 04, 2010

Pedal promise

Boston has its fair share of deserving bad reputations: the sports fans whined for some 86 years about a “curse” because the Red Sox couldn’t seal the deal; the drivers are terrible; and, thanks in no small part to those driving skills, the city’s street
The ongoing perils and recent improvements en route to a riding renaissance.
By TOM MEEK  |  May 14, 2010

Airs and graces

Somewhere in the middle of Stephen Petronio’s terrific hour-long dance I Drink the Air Before Me last Friday night, the dancers exited and the space went dark.
Stephen Petronio at the ICA, Black Grace at the Paramount
By MARCIA B. SIEGEL  |  March 26, 2010

China expert sees a nation at the 'shadow-line'

Joseph Conrad wrote of a "shadow-line," an indistinct boundary between youth and adulthood that adolescents awkwardly straddle; one moment there is impressive poise and maturity, and the next, a slip into past boorish, immature behavior.
Across the Globe
By PETER VOSKAMP  |  March 19, 2010


Review: Terribly Happy

In Henrik Ruben Genz's thriller, Copenhagen cop Robert Hansen (Jakob Cedergren), who's been reassigned for disciplinary reasons, pulls into a squalid hamlet in Denmark's South Jutland region.
Exudes an evil all its own
By PETER KEOUGH  |  March 05, 2010

Present laughter

Director Brian McEleney returns to Trinity Repertory Company for a raucous Twelfth Night that hums with energy, drollery, and a makeshift score that meshes Shakespearean ditty with such seasonal fripperies as "Auld Lang Syne" and the Mariah Carey hit
Trinity throws a Twelfth Night party
By CAROLYN CLAY  |  February 12, 2010

Faltering steps forward

As in many other sectors, the green world in 2009 was marked as much by bluster as by tangible positive action.
Going Green
By DEIRDRE FULTON  |  December 25, 2009

Youth to power

Bates College junior Robert Friedman will be missing a couple weeks of class in December.
Going Green
By DEIRDRE FULTON  |  November 27, 2009

Interview: Lone Scherfig

Born in Denmark in 1959, Lone Scherfig first gained international attention in 2000 with Italian for Beginners, a charming little film that won her the Silver Bear at the Berlin Film Festival. A couple of years later, she followed up with Wilbur Wants t
An Educated Lady
By BRETT MICHEL  |  November 13, 2009

Conservation in Copenhagen

In about a month, representatives from almost 200 nations will converge on Copenhagen, Denmark, for what could be the most meaningful meeting on climate change, ever.
Going Green
By DEIRDRE FULTON  |  November 06, 2009

Academia under attack . . . by zombies

Ah, kids these days. What with their tight pants and cigarettes and rising-from-the-dead-to-nosh-on-delicious-human-flesh . . .
Flesh in the Pan Dept.
By ALEXIS HAUK  |  October 30, 2009

Interview: Lars von Trier of Antichrist

Maybe it’s the blurring effect of the Skype technology through which I’m interviewing him as he sits worried and Buddha-like in his headquarters in Denmark (he has a phobia about airplanes, among other things), but Lars von Trier seems like an okay guy.
The director on the redeeming qualities of Antichrist
By PETER KEOUGH  |  October 23, 2009

The Olympic (shell) games

It’s been 13 years since the pageantry and spectacle of the Summer Olympic Games — and the mythical economic boon that goes with it — has graced US soil. But we’ll find out next week if, in a secret-ballot vote in Europe, the International Olympic Commit
Next week, we’ll find out if an American city will host the 2016 Olympic Games — and if Boston has a shot at 2020. Despite the glitzy international attention, there are billions of reasons why every debt-saddled American should hope that the US does not get the gold.
By ANNE ELIZABETH MOORE  |  September 25, 2009

Play by Play: August 28, 2009

Boston's weekly theater schedule
Plays from A to Z
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  August 28, 2009

barge list

The Mighty Wind

The Rhode Island recession, among the worst in the country, has become something of a national curiosity: how could such a little state be in such big trouble?
New England is answering Obama's clarion call and beginning to harvest its most viable renewable energy source. In Rhode Island, can Deepwater also blow life into our ailing economy?
By DAVID SCHARFENBERG  |  August 21, 2009

Play by play: August 21, 2009

Boston's weekly theater schedule
Plays from A to Z
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  August 21, 2009

Play by play: August 14, 2009

Boston's weekly theater schedule
Plays from A to Z
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  August 14, 2009

Play by Play: August 7, 2009

Boston's weekly theater schedule
Plays from A to Z
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  August 07, 2009

Play by play: July 31, 2009

Boston's weekly theater schedule
Plays from A to Z
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  July 31, 2009

Play by play: July 24, 2009

Boston's weekly theater schedule
Plays from A to Z
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  July 24, 2009

Play by play: July 17, 2009

Boston's theater schedule
Plays from A to Z
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  July 17, 2009

Sound and vision

When I hurried into a large tent to catch Micachu (a/k/a Mica Levi) and the Shapes at SxSW this past March, my back was killing me.  I was in shit shape. This would normally be the point where the writer’s woes get turned around by the subject’s music.
You can be old and like Micachu and the Shapes
By MICHAEL BRODEUR  |  July 10, 2009

Play by play: July 10, 2009

This week in Boston theater
Plays from A to Z
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  July 10, 2009