Carl Jung

Latest Articles

Review: A Dangerous Method

Review: A Dangerous Method(1)

Perhaps the three characters in David Cronenberg's handsome, eloquent dramatization of the birth and near demise of psychoanalysis represent the parts of the psyche that the movement would eventually hypothesize.
Cronenberg's dramatization of the rise of psychoanalysis
By PETER KEOUGH  |  December 23, 2011

Crossword: ''So Many Words''

Throwin' em out at random for you.
Throwin' em out at random for you.
By MATT JONES  |  February 19, 2010

Can we fix our broken suburbs?

Action Speaks!, the panel discussion series at Providence art space AS220, wraps up its fall run with a look at the American adventure in suburbia.
Action Speaks!
By DAVID SCHARFENBERG  |  October 23, 2009

Review: Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince

For teenagers, everything seems like the end of the world: popularity, school, love, family, treacherous conspiracies, the war between good and evil wizards.
Half-Blood isn't half bad
By PETER KEOUGH  |  July 17, 2009

Bat girl

The strange world of Bat for Lashes is a lot like ours
Kapow! Bat for Lashes conquers darkness with Two Suns
By DANIEL BROCKMAN  |  April 24, 2009


There was room for more than one young Jewish diarist in the occupied Amsterdam of World War II. Anne Frank, who died as a teen, is a 20th-century icon. But until recently, her feisty innocence hid Etty Hillesum's fire.
The Wrestling Patient at the BCA; the Lyric's Speech & Debate
By CAROLYN CLAY  |  March 31, 2009


Spring awake

Head to the American Repertory Theatre's Zero Arrow Theatre for the world premiere of Christine Evans's TROJAN BARBIE (March 28–April 22).
Local stages bloom
By LIZA WEISSTUCH  |  March 16, 2009

Our superheroes, ourselves

Is there a breed of person more tenderly optimistic, more winsomely hopeful for the best, more loyal to the possibility of good, than the American summer moviegoer?
What the current crop of comic-book action movies tells us about America's identity crisis
By JAMES PARKER  |  July 09, 2008

The princess bride

When it comes to weddings, at this point in my life, I have no idea what I should want.
Disney weds girlish fantasy with adult desire for, er, girlish fantasy
By SHARON STEEL  |  December 12, 2007

Police profile

One of these days, in a British crime movie, there will appear a gangland boss with a fetish for the Police.
They never were your average punks
By JAMES PARKER  |  July 27, 2007

Jung rascals

This article originally appeared in the June 28, 1983 issue of the Boston Phoenix.
The Police go undercover
By JOYCE MILLMAN  |  July 25, 2007


Against interpretation

To file Hallelujah the Hills under “literary rock” would be, according to frontman Ryan Walsh, an insult to literature and an insult to rock. Hallelujah the Hills, "Wave Backwards to Massachusetts" (mp3)
Hallelujah the Hills get litr’y with it
By NINA MACLAUGHLIN  |  June 12, 2007

One hell of a socialite

Summer of ’63 with Sinatra, three-times a divorcee, and a gold cape cut from the curtains of the old San Francisco opera house.
Pat Montandon's eccentric new memoir
By ELLEE DEAN  |  April 13, 2007

Crossword: 'Boardin' boredom'

Note the starred entries; I wrote this in an airport.
By MATT JONES  |  April 04, 2007

Between Heaven and Earth

When it comes to Jim Morrison and the Doors, the image factory went out of business a long time ago.
The twisted legacy of the Doors
By JAMES PARKER  |  December 13, 2006

Wolf love

Marjorie Morgan has extended her musical adventures with a new piece for seven dancers and double bassist.
  Marjorie Morgan in Brookline
By MARCIA B. SIEGEL  |  December 12, 2006


Touchy feely

Art-world sophisticates are schooled not to hunt for hidden pictures in abstract paintings, but that’s just what Cecily Brown encourages.
Cecily Brown’s paintings at the MFA, Louise Bourgeois’s dolls in Worcester  
By GREG COOK  |  November 21, 2006

Not horsing around

When aborigines first encountered colonialists’ horses, according to Alan Strang’s mother, they believed that horse and rider were one being.
God + man collide in Equus
By MEGAN GRUMBLING  |  October 11, 2006

Daytime TV turns into a book

Blame it on Oprah.
Wacky inspiration
By JEFF INGLIS  |  August 17, 2006

When animals attack

If it's South Carolina, it's not really the Red Sox.
Sports Blotter: Mascots Gone Wild Edition
By MATT TAIBBI  |  July 12, 2006

Jung at heart

Standing in front of the blossoming AV screens, Maynard Keenan is Col. Kilgore on the beach in Apocalypse Now , an apparition of stolid derangement, now and again accenting a particularly colossal time-change with a slow-motion karate kick.
Tool at the Orpheum
By JAMES PARKER  |  May 25, 2006


Alchemical ascendancy

Maynard James Keenan, to borrow an observation made about the young William Burroughs, has the face of a sheep-killing dog — taut, starved, bleakly symmetrical, with an underhang of menace.
Into the heart of Tool’s darkness
By JAMES PARKER  |  May 17, 2006