bestnom1000x50

Biology

Latest Articles

Feature_Forcier_list

Born in the wrong body

Dr. Michelle Forcier can't remember his name. But she remembers his face: a boy, 14, trapped in a girl's body. He was anguished. Hated what he was becoming.
A Providence doctor is on the leading edge of a new approach to transgender kids
By DAVID SCHARFENBERG  |  October 26, 2012
Explorer_list

URI’s ''Are You Ready For the Future?'' colloquium in brief

The future is about more than the singularity, of course. It's about robots, lab-grown organs, and watching hopelessly as the Chinese pilfer our military secrets.
Robots and lab-grown bladders
By DAVID SCHARFENBERG  |  September 30, 2011
ST032610_TheSun_list

Review: The Sun

No sun is in sight in the beginning of Aleksandr Sokurov’s look at the last days of divinity for Emperor Hirohito.
The shades close for  Emperor Hirohito
By PETER KEOUGH  |  March 26, 2010
FEAT030510_Darwin_list

Ken Miller just can’t win

What’s an honorable man to do?
Brown biology professor attacked by Darwin-hating fundies and leftie atheists alike
By DAVID SCHARFENBERG  |  March 05, 2010
1002_amazon_list

The Bicycle Feat

In the corner of the lab of Shire Human Genetic Therapies in Cambridge, you'll find a guy with DEVELOPMENT SPECIALIST written across his lab coat, unassumingly purifying proteins.
Jungle Fever
By MARIANNA FAYNSHTEYN  |  February 19, 2010
ART_Beautiful09_list

Séance

Rachel Berwick's art is concerned with conjuring ghosts — in particular the spirits of creatures or peoples near extinction or already died out.
Rachel Berwick conjures ghost birds in Zugunruhe
By GREG COOK  |  December 11, 2009


art_bearhighres_list

Hot for teacher

MECA faculty re-imagine the natural world and play with nostalgia
MECA faculty re-imagine the natural world and play with nostalgia
By ANNIE LARMON  |  December 04, 2009

Holy landscape!

Ken Burns worships America's spiritual resource
Ken Burns worships America's spiritual resource
By CLIF GARBODEN  |  September 25, 2009
0909_butler_list

Have a nice future

Blake Butler rains gravel and glass
Blake Butler rains gravel and glass
By NINA MACLAUGHLIN  |  September 11, 2009

Weathering the weather

Sweltering summer heat is finally upon us, along with how-to-keep-cool considerations.
Going Green
By DEIRDRE FULTON  |  August 07, 2009
90529_whale_list

The insult zoologist

Don Rickles, insult comic
Big Fat Whale
By BRIAN MCFADDEN  |  May 29, 2009


090417_Solo_l

Review: Goodbye Solo

So far in his brief career, North Carolina native Ramin Bahrani has tapped into the greatest naturalist filmmakers and come back the richer.
Optimistic cabbie meet cranky codger
By PETER KEOUGH  |  April 17, 2009

9. Levi Johnston

It's true that this barbaric puck slapping dingbat, who jammed his unsheathed stick in Bristol Palin's crease, made the last presidential race that much sexier. But now that his semen has manifested into an actual child who will further desecrate the ear
It's true that this barbaric puck slapping dingbat, who jammed his unsheathed stick in Bristol Palin's crease, made the last presidential race that much sexier. But now that his semen has manifested into an actual child who will further desecrate the earth with Sarah's genes, we're closing down the fan club. Bonus unsexy points for kicking her to the curb – even though as loyal Republican-haters, we thank him for illustrating all of our best arguments against social conservatism.
By Boston Phoenix Staff  |  March 26, 2009
Holmes_thumb

Exploring deep within

Hannah Holmes, the Maine-born, Portland-dwelling science writer, naturalist, and friend to all animals has turned her lens deeply inward in her latest book, The Well-Dressed Ape: A Natural History of Myself .
Animal instinct
By JEFF INGLIS  |  January 07, 2009
09109_crypto_list

Where the wild things are

Venture out into the waters and woodlands of New England, and there's a chance you'll bump into "Champ," America's own Loch Ness Monster, who allegedly plies the muddy ripples of Lake Champlain.
As our planet edges closer to the apocalypse, the escapist, fantasy world of cryptids is suddenly coming to life
By MIKE MILIARD  |  January 07, 2009
080926_barnes-list

Thanaphobe

Novelist Julian Barnes is a brilliant writer, but he’s not self-revelatory.
Julian Barnes considers the abyss
By AMY FINCH  |  December 22, 2008


Could algae be the answer for Rhode Island’s heating needs?

Scot Comey believes old mills in places like Pawtucket can be turned into incubators for strains of algae that can be grown without sunlight and turned into home heating oil.
Weird Science
By CARROLL ANDREW MORSE  |  September 10, 2008
080808_panstLIST

The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants 2

Like Sex and the City: The Movie, Sanaa Hamri’s continuation of the journey of a pair of jeans that magically fit four girls of disparate genes feels tailored for the small screen.
Disjointed, sketchy, and saccharine
By BRETT MICHEL  |  August 05, 2008
080523_robots_list

Rage against the machines!

We’re on the cusp of a perilous era. Our pitiful carbon bodies are evolving much slower than the silicon and steel gizmos we’re inventing. And the guys in the lab coats and pocket protectors are starting to worry we’ve opened Pandora’s hard drive.
Could robots take over the world? In many ways, they already have.
By MIKE MILIARD  |  May 21, 2008
080509_evolution_lsit

Springtime for Darwin

There are two stories, and two stories only.
The wars of evolution are louder than ever. What Ben Stein, Bad Religion, and a physics professor from Quincy can tell you about where you came from.
By JAMES PARKER  |  May 07, 2008
0804044_biolab_list

Biolab follies

In the beginning — way back in the fall of 2003, when the “War on Terror” was still young — the notion that anything could derail the Boston University biolab seemed absurd.
How did BU's research facility go from slam dunk to almost sunk?
By ADAM REILLY  |  April 07, 2008


00000_thisjustin

The problem with the Pope’s new list of deadly sins

The pope recently declared obscene riches, pedophilia, and causing social injustice as three of the newest deadly sins.
Morality
By MARY ANN SORRENTINO  |  April 02, 2008
080307_jose_lsirt

Less is best

González possesses the will power and the patience to dig into each of his songs until he has exhumed its bleeding heart.
The spare science of José González
By SHARON STEEL  |  March 04, 2008

Learning not to kill

This article originally appeared in the February 27, 1998 issue of the Boston Phoenix.

New techniques mean that medical students can learn without killing animals. So why won't BU get with the program?


By SARAH MCNAUGHT  |  February 28, 2008
071221_glowcat_list

You light up my litter tray

Lines upon learning that South Korean scientists, by manipulating a fluorescent protein gene, have produced cloned cats that glow in the dark.
Could be verse: poetry ripped from the headlines
By JAMES PARKER  |  December 19, 2007
071207_cow_list

They shall not pass gas

Lines upon learning that scientists have recently isolated methane-mitigating microbes in the intestinal lining of the kangaroo, and plan to replicate them in cattle to reduce the emission of “cow-created” greenhouse gas
Could be verse: poetry ripped from the headlines
By JAMES PARKER  |  December 12, 2007


071214_zombies_list

Last man standing

In his 1954 novel I Am Legend , Richard Matheson conjured up a terrifying scenario: a man-made plague has killed most of humanity.
Once a cautionary tale about human folly, has the doomsday myth become just more fun and games?
By PETER KEOUGH  |  December 12, 2007
food_bigos2list

Antidote to modern life

Finally, she says, “We have in our genes to eat bigos.” No matter where we’re from, I think we all do.
Bigos, the Old-World comfort stew
By LINDSAY STERLING  |  November 20, 2007
LISTdavid_wilson

World of wonder

You’d be surprised at how many people take the wry offerings of David Wilson’s Museum of Jurassic Technology completely seriously.
David Wilson's wry offerings
By BILL RODRIGUEZ  |  September 25, 2007
listpilobolus

Keep it moving

The Pilobolus troupe was named after a common barnyard fungus whose spores accelerate from 0-40 mph in the first millimeter of flight.
The ever-evolving Pilobolus
By JOHNETTE RODRIGUEZ  |  September 25, 2007