Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra

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Conductor karaoke

Surrealists who work with movement have to manage a demanding slight-of-hand.
Xavier Le Roy at the ICA
By DEBRA CASH  |  April 09, 2010

Double trouble

Boston Lyric Opera's debut Opera Annex production was so good in so many ways, it's painful that one bad idea just about sank it.
BLO's The Turn of the S crew, Levine's Carter and Simon Boccanegra, Teatro Lirico, the Berlin Philharmonic Wind Quintet, and more
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  February 12, 2010

John Harbison plus 10

Classical music in Boston is so rich, having to pick 10 special events for this winter preview is more like one-tenth of the performances I'm actually looking forward to.
Picking from a packed concert schedule
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  January 01, 2010

2009: The year in Classical

This was a queasy year for classical music.
Beating the quease
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  December 25, 2009

Open spaces

In my review of the memorable Brahms performances Sir Simon Rattle led with the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra for the Celebrity Series of Boston last month, I should have mentioned that one decision responsible for the beauty and spaciousness of the or
The BSO's Brahms, Ben Zander's Wagner, Collage New Music, and the BEMF's Handel
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  December 04, 2009


Simon Rattle and the BPO, Fabio Luisi and the BSO, John Harbison and Emmanuel Music
Simon Rattle and the BPO, Fabio Luisi and the BSO, John Harbison and Emmanuel Music
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  November 20, 2009


Requiem detexted

Mozart's Requiem is one of the most controversial works in the classical repertory. Mozart had completed only parts of it and sketched other parts when he died, unexpectedly at age 35, in 1791. His death ignited immediate speculation and myth.
Nicole Pierce at the Armory
By MARCIA B. SIEGEL  |  October 02, 2009

Baroque and beyond

Ten-best lists usually come at the end of the season, but this year the Phoenix has asked its critics to provide a calendar of 10 events that, at least on paper, might wind up on an end-of-season Top 10. Boston, in case you didn't know it, is a great
Betting on the best this fall
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  September 18, 2009

Loved these but not those

Of the great international orchestras, perhaps the one that's most unfairly overlooked is the London Symphony Orchestra. Yet a handful of the very greatest orchestral performances I've ever heard have been with the LSO.
Valery Gergiev, Charles Dutoit, Murray Perahia, Ian Bostridge
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  April 10, 2009

Lift every voice!

Opera is the big word for 2009.
Classical goodies for 2009
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  December 30, 2008

Our bad

As the Curator in Chief of the Museum of Bad Art, I would like to thank Ian Sands and the Boston Phoenix for the article about the opening of our new gallery in the Somerville Theatre.
Letters to the Boston editor, May 30, 2008


Love and loss

Boston’s biggest classical-music story this year was also its saddest.
Classical: 2007 in review
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  December 18, 2007

Hail and farewell

The season’s most eagerly awaited (and, with its $187 top ticket price, most expensive) classical concert was not a disappointment.
The Berlin Philharmonic’s Mahler, the St. Lawrence String Quartet, and the BSO’s Smetana
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  November 27, 2007

Not quite eternal

When what’s arguably the world’s best symphony orchestra expectations run high.
Simon Rattle and the Berlin Philharmonic in Mahler’s Das Lied von der Erde
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  November 26, 2007

Voice of authority

German baritone Thomas Quasthoff has overcome adversity (his mother took Thalidomide) to become the outstanding German lieder singer of his generation.
Thomas Quasthoff holds forth
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  November 14, 2007

Low rent

With good singing, acting, and conducting, a stage director for La bohème can afford to keep out of the way, which is pretty much what Ocel does.
Boston Lyric Opera’s latest La bohème; plus Collage’s Berio, and Markus Stenz at the BSO
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  November 06, 2007


The hottest and brightest

The New England Conservatory is bringing to Symphony Hall the hottest of young conductors.
Rescued by music
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  November 01, 2007

World music

There’s more to Boston’s classical music scene than the Boston Symphony Orchestra.
The BSO goes traveling, and Berlin comes to Boston
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  September 12, 2007

Innocents abroad?

Great symphony orchestras don’t just play at home.
The BSO prepares to go on tour
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  August 22, 2007

Changing lives

People who love the arts are fond of saying that art changes our lives. Slideshow: The New England Conservatory’s Youth Philharmonic Orchestra visits Venezuela and Brazil
 The New England Conservatory’s Youth Philharmonic Orchestra visits Venezuela and Brazil
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  December 15, 2006


James Bolle’s final concert of Monadnock Music’s summer season began with a work that had had its premiere in Keene, New Hampshire, 70 years and three days earlier.
American ballet music at Monadnock; a young Latin American conductor at Tanglewood
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  August 30, 2006


Good vibrations?

The string vibrato developed as an orchestral sonority only in the 20th century. Does that mean that your favorite performances of everyone from Bach to Berg don’t really sound the way the composer intended?
Roger Norrington cleans up classical music
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  March 14, 2006