Latest Articles


Travelin’ Man

Wows were issued to us all the way from the muddy banks of Dodds Farm, New York, where local bluegrass dude PUTNAM SMITH was the only Mainer to play in last weekend's 21st annual Falcon Ridge Festival.
The Wax Tablet

Review: Karen Gelardi's 'botanical propaganda' at Perimeter Gallery

Two recent groups of Karen Gelardi's studies of nature (she calls it "botanical propaganda") harness a bold and painterly craft aesthetic among the rough wood benches and baskets of lush melons and gourds in the open industrial space that also serves a
Color fields
By ANNIE LARMON  |  September 03, 2010

Moving forward

The Center for Maine Contemporary Art is back in full swing after an unexpected winter hiatus.
The CMCA Biennial balances past and present
By ANNIE LARMON  |  June 04, 2010

Review: Class Machine, Lady Lamb the Beekeeper, Dead Man’s Clothes

May 10, SPACE Gallery + Port City Music Hall, Portland
Music Seen
By CHRISTOPHER GRAY  |  May 14, 2010

Fine wine, fine cause

Drinking for a good cause is starting to catch on in Portland.
Distributors partner to raise money, educate Portlanders on wines of the world
By LEISCHEN STELTER  |  April 02, 2010

Looking for a reason to head to Belfast?

April 24 might be a good bet

Anti-solitary campaign expands

As the February 17 State House public hearing approaches on the bill to restrict solitary confinement at the Maine State Prison, the National Religious Campaign Against Torture (NRCAT), which sparked national debate about Abu Ghraib and Guantánamo, has a
Stopping Supermax Torture
By LANCE TAPLEY  |  February 05, 2010

An idyll examined

After 36 films and more than 40 years of filmmaking, Frederick Wiseman has probably come as close as any director to capturing this American life in all its breadth and nuance.
Frederick Wiseman's four-hour, 1999 documentary about Belfast, Maine
By CHRISTOPHER GRAY  |  January 29, 2010

Food on stage

Maine is home to a nationally renowned locavore culinary scene, the oldest organic farming association in the nation (MOFGA), and a plenitude of farms that has increased by nearly 1000 in the past five years — and yet economic pressure to develop acrea
Locavores + thespians = understanding
By MEGAN GRUMBLING  |  January 08, 2010

Pasha Turkish & Mediterranean Cuisine

Even without enormous evidence, the Nadeau family has decided that "Turkish food never lets you down." Louise likes to grab lunch downtown at Boston Kebab House; Maurice prefers Allston's Saray; and Stephanie and her school friends enjoy Brookline Famil
A fantastically long list of Turkish delights
By ROBERT NADEAU  |  December 04, 2009

Tavern at the End of the World

They say there's no accounting for taste, though most folks will agree that if your tastes and mine are similar, then we both have good taste. This occurred to me as I scanned the jukebox at Charlestown's Tavern at the End of the World, a neighborhood b
Nice surprises in a warm, pubby package
By MC SLIM JB  |  November 20, 2009


The roar of the crowd

I wasn’t there, but the opening-night dissatisfaction with the Met’s new Tosca was widely reported.
‘Opening Night at Symphony,’ Russell Sherman, the Discovery Ensemble, Boston Musica Viva, and the Bostonians
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  October 02, 2009

Desegregation Day

Southie: Ugly Crowds at the Trouble Spot
Southie: Ugly Crowds at the Trouble Spot
By TOM SHEEHAN  |  September 18, 2009

Music Seen: Roots and Tendrils

Belfast as a destination just got more desirable with the addition of Roots and Tendrils. Nestled downtown, the light from the plate-glass windows and lush landscaped front lawn complete with brilliant colored chairs and lawn sculptures invite anyone he
Worth the drive
By SONYA TOMLINSON  |  September 04, 2009

Review: Fifty Dead Men Walking

In the 1980s in Northern Ireland, a petty hustler named Martin McGartland (Jim Sturgess) went from street-corner obscurity to playing a major role in the war in Belfast between Catholics and Protestants, as he swore allegiance to the militant branch of
Fast-paced but uninvolving
By GERALD PEARY  |  August 21, 2009

Springer vs. Nero!

Two opera productions overlapping at the Calderwood Pavilion exploit exploitation.
Monteverdi's Poppea opens the Boston Early Music Festival, plus the Cantata Singers, the Discovery Ensemble, and Barbara Cook at the Pops
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  June 12, 2009

art list

Rural vernacular

A documenter of the contemporary American experience with portraits of our most mundane infrastructure, Belfast-based Linden Frederick has been chosen as this year's distinguished artist by the Center for Maine Contemporary Art in Rockport. In the show
Contemplating Linden Frederick at CMCA
By ANNIE LARMON  |  June 05, 2009

Was not was

Portland continues to establish itself as a critical northern outpost of digital music with the release this month of Vik44's Was Never White . As the genre matures and evolves, it's some of the most interesting music to listen to because there are no
Vik44's shades of white
By SAM PFEIFLE  |  May 29, 2009

Review: Hunger

Most films about the Irish Troubles don't get how Catholic it all is.
Steve McQueen cuts to the truth
By PETER KEOUGH  |  March 24, 2009

Some people have real problems

Mainers are facing grievous financial burdens. Stores and factories are shutting down. Businesses that stay open are laying people off. Unemployment is rising as fast as the foreclosure rate on homes. And housing prices are sinking like the value of ret
Politics and other mistakes
By AL DIAMON  |  February 11, 2009

Anniversaries and other occasions

Anniversaries, however fabricated, can still be useful. This year commemorates the 200th birthday of Felix Mendelssohn, the 150th birthday of Victor Herbert (both recently celebrated with intensive "orgies" on WHRB), the 200th anniversary of Haydn's dea
Masur's Mendelssohn, Orfeos from Norrington and Levine, the Discovery Ensemble, and the Inauguration 'performance'
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  January 27, 2009


Elements + islands

Dennis Pinette, who was born in the Penobscot Bay town of Belfast and lives there still, makes completely contemporary paintings whose roots extend back through those epic early days of American painting.
Dennis Pinette's identity is on display at CMCA
By KEN GREENLEAF  |  November 05, 2008

Baldacci raids the cookie jar

Under the American system of government, the legislative branch is supposed to decide how your tax money is spent, but . . .  
The governor’s secret Dirigo Health bailout
By LANCE TAPLEY  |  October 15, 2008

Pigboat + Bat Shelter + Full Contact Kitty

Belfast art-monsters Full Contact Kitty took the stage around 10:15 pm with a heady brew of dissonant chords and droning feedback.
Music seen at Geno’s, September 19, 2008
By DAN CLARK  |  September 25, 2008

Local Loraxes

Choirspeak was conceived as an arts-based way to start and share conversations about our various relationships with Maine’s forests, resources which are in a lot of flux these days.
Mainers speak of the trees
By MEGAN GRUMBLING  |  July 16, 2008

Growing up

In the early ’90s the sleepy little Downeast town of Belfast had its 15 minutes of fame.
The mature art of longtime Maine artists
By KEN GREENLEAF  |  April 09, 2008

Whatchu talkin’ about?

“It’s like going through puberty again.”
Politics and other mistakes
By AL DIAMON  |  March 26, 2008

Wave of reform

A wave of change is moving swiftly toward Maine’s jails and prisons. It could bring major reform — or a bureaucratic jumble.
There is now a chance to fix Maine’s broken corrections system, but only if the public speaks up
By LANCE TAPLEY  |  February 06, 2008


In Kings , which is getting six screenings at the MFA, it’s 1977, and six spry Irish lads are sailing toward London, buoyed by grand expectations.
Kings  in Gaelic, plus Brattle Staff Picks
By GERALD PEARY  |  December 31, 2007

We’re all doing time

The facts are almost unbelievable: As a nation, our incarceration rate is five times what it was 30 years ago and the highest in the world.
By LANCE TAPLEY  |  August 29, 2007