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Bela Tarr

Latest Articles

Review: The Turin Horse

Review: The Turin Horse(1)

Legend has it that in Turin, Friedrich Nietzsche came across a horse being beaten by its driver. Nietzsche embraced the horse, went insane, and remained so for the rest of his life.
Bela Tarr's final film
By PETER KEOUGH  |  March 09, 2012
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Tilda Swinton's mixed metamorphoses

Most people know Tilda Swinton either from her role as the White Witch in the Narnia movies or as the striking-looking woman who in her speech accepting the Best Supporting Actress Oscar for her performance in Michael Clayton said she was going to gi
Indie-cinema luminary gets retrospective in P-Town
By PETER KEOUGH  |  June 12, 2010
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Review: The Man From London

I had to wonder whether this latest film from Béla Tarr (co-directed by Ágnes Hranitzky) is a self-parody.
London imbroglio
By PETER KEOUGH  |  January 15, 2010
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Wish-fulfillment for a burning world

From the shining big-screen debut of Iron Man to the large amounts of green produced by the Incredible Hulk, this was the year the public couldn't get enough of their favorite heroes.
The 2008 heroic holiday DVD and Blu-ray gift guide
By BRETT MICHEL  |  December 08, 2008
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Once upon a time in Hungary

Since its release in 1994, Hungarian auteur Béla Tarr’s 435-minute sui generis masterpiece Sátántangó has had the top critics grasping for superlatives.
Béla Tarr’s epic arrives on DVD
By PETER KEOUGH  |  August 26, 2008
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Kino pravda

Because Mosfilm, the subject of the Museum of Fine Arts’ “Envisioning Russia” retrospective, was the Soviet state production studio, any cross-section of its history lays out the entirety of Soviet film history.
‘Envisioning Russia’ at the MFA
By MICHAEL ATKINSON  |  August 26, 2008


Doing time

It's not so much about killing as it is about time. Horror scope: Robert Graysmith’s Zodiac obsession. By Peter Keough
Fincher kills it without frills in Zodiac
By PETER KEOUGH  |  February 28, 2007
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Rain man

Let’s take stock of Béla Tarr, the great Hungarian dyspeptic, and maybe the most famous and revered international film titan to have been so pitifully screened in American theaters that his public profile here is tantamount to an embargo.
The lingering gaze of Béla Tarr at the HFA
By MICHAEL ATKINSON  |  January 10, 2007

Fallen

Drain Blow-Up of its psychedelic hues and manic outbursts and you’re imagining Fred Kelemen’s darker-than-noir existential mystery.
 
By PETER KEOUGH  |  January 18, 2006