Latest Articles


Review: The Details

God is not in these details. Jacob Aaron Estes's black comedy gets so dark that it's not even funny.

By PETER KEOUGH  |  November 02, 2012
Short take_Alps

Review: Alps

Like his last feature, Dogtooth, Greek director Yorgos Lanthimos's new film breaks down the conventions of identity, language, and social roles with black comic — and tragic — effect.

By PETER KEOUGH  |  October 05, 2012
Review ThinIce

Review: Thin Ice

Brilliantly original in Thirteen Conversations About One Thing (2001), Jill Sprecher and her co-writer sister Karen seem to have gone through a card file of used ideas to cobble together this black comedy.
A little bit of this and that
By PETER KEOUGH  |  April 06, 2012
Review: Tyrannosaur

Review: Tyrannosaur(1)

In his directorial debut, actor Paddy Considine has learned that the best way to develop sympathy for someone who kicks his dog to death is by comparing him to another character (Eddie Marsan) who urinates on his wife.
Paddy Considine's directorial debut
By PETER KEOUGH  |  February 24, 2012
Red Tails - Short takes

Review: Red Tails

With a title that refers not to squirrels but to plane markings, Red Tails dramatizes the struggles and triumphs of African-American pioneers, the Tuskegee Airmen.
The struggles and triumphs of the Tuskegee Airmen
By BETSY SHERMAN  |  January 27, 2012
Tales from the Golden Age: Review

Review: Tales from the Golden Age

The ironically titled film refers to the dreadful Alice-in-Wonderland years when Nicolae Ceausescu was the Communist strongman of Romania.
Panorama of black-humor stories
By GERALD PEARY  |  December 02, 2011

Burke & Hare: Review

Review: Burke & Hare

Simon Pegg and Andy Serkis are only faintly humorous as the titular team of assassins, Burke and Hare .
Mediocre black comedy
By GERALD PEARY  |  December 02, 2011
Everyday Sunshine: Short Take

Everyday Sunshine: The Story of Fishbone

Lev Anderson and Chris Metzler's documentary details Fishbone's quarter-century journey from musically-diverse South Central middle school classmates to becoming one of the most influential Los Angeles bands of the '80s.
Fishbone's quarter-century journey
By SCOTT FAYNER  |  November 18, 2011
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Review: The Disappearance of McKinley Nolan

An investigative doc brimming with cultural resonance and historical savvy, Henry Corra's film has ahold of a pungent story — that of the titular black Texan fella who vanished in Vietnam 40 years ago.
Rich in mysteries
By MICHAEL ATKINSON  |  September 02, 2011
cellgraft 3

Tampa re-emerging as a death-metal hotbed

People up here in the Northeast normally associate Tampa, Florida, with balmy beaches and snowbirds. But look beyond the sands and the area is the perfect grindcore dystopia: boulevards flanked by miles of strip sprawl cut across a lattice of low-slung
Dark rays
By JANSSEN MCCORMICK  |  August 26, 2011
sewer goddess 4

Shaping noise into extreme metal with Sewer Goddess

Sewer Goddess are gritty, grimy, and unpleasant listening, but a growing legion of gluttons flock to the band's audial punishment.
The grimy underground
By IAN DUNCAN-BROWN  |  August 26, 2011

attack the block 3

Review: Attack the Block

As a group of teenage thugs approach their intended victim (only their eyes are visible as they glare at the trainee nurse who's walking the cold south London streets alone on the way home from her shift), you'll be forgiven if you recall the recent wave
London crawling
By BRETT MICHEL  |  August 19, 2011
taste persia 2

Review: Jasmine Taste of Persia

Boston is fortunate to boast a number of worthy budget-priced Persian restaurants, among which Jasmine Taste of Persia, located in a stretch of Watertown thick with indie restaurants and Armenian bakeries/grocers, has to rate highly.
A winning introduction to an underrated cuisine
By MC SLIM JB  |  August 05, 2011
Boston Convention Center - Urban League

With the Urban League conference coming next week, Boston's movers and shakers are scrambling to project a progressive racial image

After years of trying to convince groups with large minority membership that the Hub is now a welcoming, friendly destination for African-Americans, this is the first big organization to test the theory.
Showtime for New Boston
By DAVID S. BERNSTEIN  |  July 22, 2011
Ash Borer 2011

Ash Borer | Ash Borer

NorCal black-metal trio Ash Borer's debut full-length is as diminutive as their namesake (limited to a 150-cassette run) but no less destructive or striking as they hurtle through three tracks in 40 minutes.
Flenser (2011)
By JANSSEN McCORMICK  |  July 15, 2011

Ask a Black Woman: Harry Reid edition

Just in time for Black History Month, another installment of "Ask a Black Woman," thanks to JT in Portland who in early January asked me: What's your take on the Harry Reid thing?
Diverse City
By SHAY STEWART-BOULEY  |  February 05, 2010

Me, myself, and race

I have been told by many different people at many different times that I put too much thought into race, that perhaps I overreact and see race as a factor when it might not be.
Diverse City
By SHAY STEWART-BOULEY  |  July 24, 2009

In the same boat

It's summertime in Maine, a sweet and all-too-short season that generally makes living here the other nine or 10 months worth it. Except that this year, sun and warmth have apparently decided that, like access to the credit markets, they won't be avail
Diverse City
By SHAY STEWART-BOULEY  |  June 26, 2009

Gender balance

Diversity isn’t even just about being open-minded. In the end, it’s about fairness.
LD 1020 and marriage fairness
By SHAY STEWART-BOULEY  |  May 01, 2009

Is black the new black?

Was new Portland police chief picked because he is black?
Was new Portland police chief picked because he is black?
By SHAY STEWART-BOULEY  |  March 04, 2009

Uh, race still matters, folks

In a few short days Barack Obama will go from being our first black president-elect to our first black president. Yes siree, the black guy is finally going to be in charge. We finally did it. Welcome to post-racial America!
Diverse city
By SHAY STEWART-BOULEY  |  January 07, 2009

Looking Back

Since Barack Obama’s election, there have been many congratulatory essays — verbal and written — about the greatness of Americans being able to elect a person of color to our highest office.
America didn’t become colorblind in 2008
By MARY ANN SORRENTINO  |  December 29, 2008

Black label

Black plays like an ode to gleeful, cathartic violence.
A distilled shooter that goes down smooth
By MITCH KRPATA  |  March 28, 2006