Latest Articles


Review: Whore's Glory

Austrian documentarian Michael Glawogger takes his camera into three pitiable spots where there is open prostitution, and where painted ladies, desperate for a living wage, service the most craven clientele.
Painted ladies
By GERALD PEARY  |  June 15, 2012

Mostly noir

The definition of film noir has become elastic through the years. Of the five movies included in the MFA’s series “Rialto’s Best of British Film Noir” only two, strictly speaking, are noirs: Brighton Rock, Graham Greene & Terence Rattigan’s adaptatio
And mostly masterpieces, at the Museum of Fine Arts from June 2-13.
By STEVE VINEBERG  |  May 28, 2010

The Big Hurt: Reed goes to the dogs

More evidence of the sickening barbarity of America’s penal institutions: Lil Wayne is being hassled because officers found headphones and the charger for an MP3 player in his cell.
Plus Weezy debudded, Ant derided, Michaels bandanna’d
By DAVID THORPE  |  May 28, 2010

After images

Karen Finley won’t be naked, or covered in chocolate. Candied yams will not be involved. If there are neighborhood morality-watch squads in Salem, they’ll have the night off.
Karen Finley does Jackie
By JIM SULLIVAN  |  May 28, 2010

Youth movement

In the current Fusionworks production, Locally Grown , artistic director Deb Meunier and her company are welcoming two dance groups from local high schools.
Fusionworks’ Locally Grown
By JOHNETTE RODRIGUEZ  |  May 07, 2010

Is genius immortal?

No disrespect to the man who let there be electric light, but Ray Kurzweil is Thomas Alva Edison on steroids.
Tech god Ray Kurzweil is a modern-day Edison. Now he's battling to stay alive — forever
By CHRIS FARAONE  |  April 30, 2010


Review: In Search of Memory

Memory, like consciousness, eludes analysis. Nobel Prize–winning neuroscientist Eric Kandel, the subject of this subtly layered documentary by Petra Seeger, took the approach of reductionism to figure it out.
Mind-altering. Seriously.
By PETER KEOUGH  |  April 23, 2010

All you need is love

Outpourings of love have been flooding the Boston musical scene.
Marylou Speaker Churchill memorial, Emmanuel Music’s Haydn/Schoenberg, and more
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  April 23, 2010

Review: The Secret In Their Eyes

The Counterfeiters (Austria) won in 2008, Departures (Japan) triumphed in 2009, and in 2010 the Best Foreign Language Film Oscar went to this piece of crap from Argentina.
The Academy got it wrong
By PETER KEOUGH  |  April 16, 2010

Ravishing beauty

The wreckage at the end of Modernist art's main thrust is the starting point for "Pat Steir: Drawing Out of Line," a four-decade retrospective of the New Yorker's drawings at the RISD Museum.
‘Pat Steir: Drawing Out of Line’ at the RISD Museum
By GREG COOK  |  March 19, 2010

Photos: 'Seeing Songs' at MFA

Contemporary Outlook: Seeing Songs at the MFA
An eclectic mix of work that draws on music as inspiration
By PHOENIX STAFF  |  July 17, 2009

Music Seen: Lost Cause Desperados

Lost Cause Desperados have kept a low profile over the last few months, with gigs few and far between. None of that downtime has gone to waste, however, as Portland's kings of warp-speed garage-punk have been hard at work on their upcoming album, Deser
and Johnie 3, DeeCRACKS, The New 45 at Geno's, July 2
By DAN CLARK  |  July 10, 2009

Review: Brüno

Candide camera
Sacha Baron Cohen's Brüno restores bad taste to its rightful place
By A.S. HAMRAH  |  July 10, 2009

Engine notes

The big question with Top Gear, the popular British consumer-car show (in perpetual reruns on BBC America), is this: will it succeed in denting my colossal lack of curiosity about cars?
Top Gear hits heavy traffic
By JAMES PARKER  |  May 08, 2009

Dance, Monkey!: Taylor Newhall

We put a comic on the hot seat. This week's victim . . .
Eats stinky cheese
By SARA FAITH ALTERMAN  |  March 19, 2009


F amed chef Barbara Lynch has a two-part plan for taking over the Fort Point Channel area.
Lynch tests new, comfortable waters
By ROBERT NADEAU  |  February 19, 2009


Celebratory swigs

How do we celebrate the holidays during a global financial fiasco?
Holiday bottles that don't break the bank
By TODD RICHARD  |  November 12, 2008

Women on the verge

At next week’s Democratic National Convention in Denver, Hillary Clinton’s delegates will get just about everything they’ve wanted — aside from the nomination of their candidate, of course.
Clinton die-hards have created a new-girls’ network bent on remedying decades of sexism by putting women in elected office
By DAVID S. BERNSTEIN  |  August 20, 2008

R.I.P. Richard Egbert, super-tough defense lawyer

In the time before Buddy Cianci’s Plunder Dome trial in 2002, I met with Richard Egbert, the quintessential take-no-prisoners defense lawyer, and gleaned a telling detail about him.
In Memoriam
By IAN DONNIS  |  July 30, 2008

Fringe festival

Off the beaten path, the fringes of Boston's gallery scene are seeing new development, and even expansion.
Galleries off the beaten path
By GREG COOK  |  June 10, 2008


Design geeks bow before the 45-year-old Austrian-born, New York–based designer’s witty topographical experiments and bad-ass stunts.
Interview: Stefan Sagmeister goes the limit
By GREG COOK  |  May 27, 2008


Gastronomic stimulus package

This, coupled with the thaw and other natural stimulus packages, write a recipe for the spoils of spring: maturing cheeses, bright wines, green garlic ramps, and outdoor eating.
Splurge a little at the Cheese Iron
By TODD RICHARD  |  April 30, 2008

The most dangerous Games

Although it has only one really graphic moment of violence, Michael Haneke’s Funny Games probably distresses audiences more than the torture porn in the Saw and Hostel series.
Michael Haneke’s thriller still feels Funny
By PETER KEOUGH  |  March 12, 2008

The play’s the thing

A couple of weeks ago at the Oscars, the first Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film to go to an Austrian went to the wrong filmmaker.
 Interview: Michael Haneke on the rules of his Games
By PETER KEOUGH  |  March 04, 2008

A child of Hitler

This article originally appeared in the February 1, 1983 issue of the Boston Phoenix.

Growing up in the Third Reich (a memoir)

By ALFONS HECK  |  January 30, 2008


Patrick McGinley is an inveterate traveler.
Finding sounds with Patrick McGinley’s Murmer
By SUSANNA BOLLE  |  December 31, 2007


Frankly speaking

Your superior correspondents were somewhat amused by comments made last week by Carlo Pisaturo in the Warwick Beacon .
Sore loser misses the mark on Ferri’s Warwick triumph
By PHILLIPE AND JORGE  |  December 05, 2007

Slowly they turn

We are heading toward a sentimental season of holidays, so the Rhode Island Theatre Ensemble is preparing the way with a wintry 19th-century melodrama, Leopold Lewis’s The Bells .
RITE's melodramtic take on The Bells
By BILL RODRIGUEZ  |  November 06, 2007

Gov: Cut services while I travel overseas

Lobbyists and campaign contributors are among the private interests paying for Governor John Baldacci’s upcoming trip to Asia, though the state forbids officials from accepting gifts.
While Baldacci takes lobbyists’ money for a trip, his wife bills taxpayers
By LANCE TAPLEY  |  October 24, 2007

Bravo Rivo!

September 30 was a delicious day for this secular Jew
Plus Flickipedia
By GERALD PEARY  |  October 17, 2007