Latest Articles


The Obama imperative

Two things stand between almost certain economic and social catastrophe: the prospect of the Democrats maintaining — or expanding — their majority in the Senate, and the reelection of President Barack Obama.

By EDITORIAL  |  November 02, 2012

Maine Azeris remember a massacre

Maine Azeris remember a massacre
A commemorative feast
By LINDSAY STERLING  |  March 09, 2012

Review: My Thai Vegan Cafe

It's not easy being vegan.
Vegan Thai cuisine even omnivores can love  
By MC SLIM JB  |  October 14, 2011

Rock of Ages lets its hair down at PPAC

Rock of Ages is such an explosive, face-melting jukebox musical that only afterward do we realize it didn't include two hours of skyrocket pyrotechnics — although all the laser beams through fog come close.
Can’t fight this feeling
By BILL RODRIGUEZ  |  October 07, 2011

Review: Detective Dee and the Mystery of the Phantom Flame

The latest action epic from Hong Kong new wave director Tsui Hark ( Once Upon a Time in China ) is a fact-based historical drama set in 689 AD, a period when "all hell was about to break loose," according to the dense narration that opens the film.
Exhilarating action
By BRETT MICHEL  |  September 23, 2011
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Review: The Disappearance of McKinley Nolan

An investigative doc brimming with cultural resonance and historical savvy, Henry Corra's film has ahold of a pungent story — that of the titular black Texan fella who vanished in Vietnam 40 years ago.
Rich in mysteries
By MICHAEL ATKINSON  |  September 02, 2011

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Review: Think Tank Bistrotheque

The owners have some very good ideas about food and drink — Southeast Asian treats are cool, and craft cocktails go better with them than wine does — but they have also produced some decisions that make the rest of us scratch our heads.
Southeast Asian treats among some head-scratchers
By ROBERT NADEAU  |  August 19, 2011

Review: Figa

In the not-so-distant future, thanks to poor management and changing weather patterns, we are likely to face crippling shortages of fresh water.
Figa opens at last, with influences delicate and broad
By BRIAN DUFF  |  April 22, 2011

Saigon has a lovely Vietnamese mix of influences

For those who move to Maine from more diverse parts of the country, going out for an Asian meal requires some adjustments.
Melting pot
By BRIAN DUFF  |  October 29, 2010
The Asia at the Zeiterion Theatre

The Asia at the Zeiterion Theatre

"Asia, when all my dime dancing is through/I runnn to yooooou . . . ." Oh, wait - wrong song; wrong band, too. That's Steely...
By webteam  |  July 28, 2010

Review: Restrepo

Before his name became that of a hellish outpost on a mountaintop in the Korengal Valley, perhaps the most dangerous place on earth, PFC Juan S. Restrepo was a human being, a 20-year-old single father, an accomplished guitarist, and a medic in the 173rd
War in the raw: taking the high ground in Afghanistan
By PETER KEOUGH  |  July 02, 2010

Theology class

My religion teaches me that I have a responsibility to work to create a better world for humanity and for all living beings in the world that God created.
Letters to the  Phoenix editor, July 2, 2010
By PHOENIX LETTERS  |  July 02, 2010

Worse than Afghanistan

At almost the same moment that Rolling Stone was reordering the political landscape with its devastating profile of the now-resigned Afghanistan commander General Stanley McChrystal, a smaller, lesser-known political monthly, The American Conservative
Mainstream media flunks again
By PETER KADZIS  |  July 02, 2010

Dutch courage

When you've already written a novel like Cloud Atlas , which travels from 1850 to the apocalyptic future and back again, writing a historical novel might be redundant.
David Mitchell's Jacob de Zoet revises historical fiction
By PETER KEOUGH  |  June 25, 2010

Harper's Magazine, 1850-1980

It seems but a moment ago that the sound of Dylan and Baez, the Beatles and the Stones reverberated through a world bent on catastrophe. Has it been almost 20 years?
The legacy of Willie Morris and Lewis H. Lapham
By MARCO TRBOVICH  |  June 25, 2010

Art in the air conditioning

From Picasso to William "Shrek" Steig's cartoons, and surfer photos to a Twilight Zone toy store, New England offers art worth traveling to this summer. Here we round up the best in the region, no matter the weather or your artistic inclinations.
Local museums keep you cool — and the art's pretty good, too
By GREG COOK  |  June 18, 2010


Rockport rules

Pianist David Deveau, celebrating his 15th year as director of the Rockport Chamber Music Festival (now Rockport Music) and the opening of the elegant, $20 million Shalin Liu Performance Center on Main Street, said that the sound in the new hall, at the
A new beginning for the music festival
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  June 18, 2010

Playing Thai-alai

The writer Stephen Metcalf recently suggested that the cult of cultural authenticity has reached a tipping point analogous to our desperate search for oil.
Fast-moving small plates engage at Boda
By BRIAN DUFF  |  June 18, 2010

Book bag for the dog days

Planning to be lazy and let it all go this summer? Sorry, there are too many good books to read. From Allegra Goodman's The Cookbook Collector to Richard Rhodes's The Twilight of the Bombs and Jean Valentine's Break the Glass , you'll find tomes gal
Load up your Goodman, Gordimer, Franzen, Moody, and more
By BARBARA HOFFERT  |  June 18, 2010

Spookin' the horses

Move over, Freddy Krueger. Here come the real scary monsters: Libby Mitchell and Paul LePage.
Scary trumps stupid every time
By AL DIAMON  |  June 18, 2010

Knowing no shame

The recent rush to adjourn the 2010 General Assembly session on the arbitrary date of June 10 was an affront to the Rhode Island citizenry and a low mark for the state’s politicians.
The disgraceful General Assembly; hail, do-gooders; and a plea for ProHo
By PHILLIPE AND JORGE  |  June 18, 2010


Slideshow: Drainspotting in Japan

A collection of artistic Japanese manhole covers
  Remo Camerota's photographs of manhole covers in Japan, where 95% of municipalities take pride in their artistic drains.
By REMO CAMEROTA  |  June 11, 2010

Photos: Japanese Mascots

Meet the mascots from Edward Harrison and John Harrison's book  Idle Idol.
Japan's love of kitsch and cuteness in all aspects of life, as expressed by their mascots.

Review: Wu's

When I heard that Wu’s was the favorite restaurant of a vegetarian acquaintance, I thought we might give it a try.
Turning up the heat in Westerly
By JOHNETTE RODRIGUEZ  |  June 11, 2010

Making waves

Rhode Island’s upstart National Public Radio affiliate, WRNI, aims to be nothing less than a major media player here. And in the space of just a couple of years, the station has taken some impressive first steps.
Can WRNI supplant the ProJo as the state’s news king?
By DAVID SCHARFENBERG  |  June 11, 2010

Plan B(1)

With the end of the long primary campaign, Mainers are facing an ugly reality.
 Post-primary predictions
By AL DIAMON  |  June 11, 2010


Pointing fingers in the Gulf

Now that we have enlisted the aid of James Cameron, Kevin Costner, Betty White, and the Olneyville New York System Oil, Olestra, and Anal Leakage Institute to help plug the BP underwater gusher in the Gulf of Mexico, let’s take a look at what is really b
The disaster was waiting to happen; kudos for Grover; and gangsta talk
By PHILLIPE AND JORGE  |  June 11, 2010

Review: The Karate Kid (2010)

What happens when Will Smith wants a franchise for his boy.
Shouldn't it be "The Kung Fu Kid"?
By BRETT MICHEL  |  June 11, 2010

Reality bites

At some point or another, the greatest artists are pegged as oddballs, weirdos, freaks. Being a great artist does mean going out on a limb.
The singular surrealism of Robyn Hitchcock
By DANIEL BROCKMAN  |  June 04, 2010

Review: Beetle Queen Conquers Tokyo

The cheeky title conjures up belovedly tacky 1950s Japanese sci-fi films, but Jessica Oreck’s actual effort is a pallid, thinly poetic documentary essay about Japan’s obsession with insects.
Pallid documentary on Japan's insect obsession
By GERALD PEARY  |  June 04, 2010