Anton Webern

Latest Articles


Second sight

May in Boston has always been Storybook Ballet Month, as Boston Ballet finished off its season with Swan Lake or Sleeping Beauty or Don Quixote , something classical and highbrow and reassuring. That, after all, is what Boston audiences want, right?
Boston Ballet reprises Jirí Kylián’s Black & White
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  May 21, 2010

Covering Lacy

For Josh Sinton, Steve Lacy stood out almost from the beginning.
A jazz master’s legacy finds traction
By JON GARELICK  |  May 21, 2010

Henry Threadgill Zooid | This Brings Us To, Volume 1

Henry Threadgill has been reinventing his language — and by extension the jazz language — for at least 30 years, beginning with the trio Air in the 1970s.
Pi (2009)
By JON GARELICK  |  October 30, 2009

The old is new

Birdsongs of the Mesozoic bring back Roger
Birdsongs of the Mesozoic bring back Roger
By MATT PARISH  |  July 24, 2009

Dance noir

Looking for a spooky Valentine? Try Jirí Kylián's Black and White .
The Czech choreographer/Nederlands Dans Theater director made an evening out of five pieces — No More Play, Petite Mort, Sarabande, Falling Angels, and Sechs Tänze — he'd created between 1986 and 1991.
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  February 13, 2009

The marriage of Heaven and Hell

It’s been a joy to see James Levine back on the Symphony Hall podium, with his admirable combination of vitality and sensitivity.
Levine’s Schubert and Bolcom, Boston Baroque’s King Arthur, Jan Curtis
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  March 07, 2008


Conquering heroes

One sign of Boston’s rich classical-music scene is that there are often hard choices to make when two outstanding events are scheduled at the same time.
Winterreise  from Thomas Quasthoff and James Levine, the Cecilia’s Handel, Levine’s return, Brendel’s farewell
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  February 29, 2008

Personal code

The connection between jazz and India is at least as old as John Coltrane’s composition named for that country.
Rudresh Mahanthappa’s Indo-jazz connection
By JON GARELICK  |  February 12, 2008

Not quite eternal

When what’s arguably the world’s best symphony orchestra expectations run high.
Simon Rattle and the Berlin Philharmonic in Mahler’s Das Lied von der Erde
By JEFFREY GANTZ  |  November 26, 2007

Stormy weather

The BSO has been having terrible luck hanging on to its star soloists.
BSO cancellations, plus the Camerata, Jonathan Biss, Emmanuel Music, and more
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  March 28, 2007

Damned good

James Levine returned from his winter break with one of the most thrilling BSO concerts of his tenure: Berlioz’s “dramatic legend,” La damnation de Faust.
Levine’s Berlioz and Wuorinen, Garrick Ohlsson’s Beethoven, the Borromeo’s Shostakovich, the Alloy’s Eagle
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  February 20, 2007


The best of times, the worst of times

This year Boston classical music lost some of its most beloved figures — some, like mezzo-soprano Lorraine Hunt Lieberson, at the very height of their extraordinary powers, others, like opera director Sarah Caldwell and her conductor/collaborator, Osbo
A year in classical
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  December 20, 2006

Mixed blessings

The Boston Symphony Orchestra began the new year with one of its most disappointing concerts since music director James Levine took over.
Ringing in the new year on a mostly high note
By LLOYD SCHWARTZ  |  January 18, 2006