Abu Ghraib

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At Brown, torture in watercolor

Stroll down College Street from Brown University during the next few weeks and you'll find Providence's iconic spires and skyscrapers slightly obscured by a banner hanging from a streetlight outside Brown's List Art Building.
Foreign affairs
By PHILIP EIL  |  April 05, 2013

Review: The Watch

The Watch is hard to watch.
A lapse in good taste
By PETER KEOUGH  |  August 03, 2012

Victoria Mansion stages an unsettlingly brilliant show

In a prodigious steampunk exhibit, the collective works in "Victoria's Wonderama" compound the motifs and fascinations of the 19th century with a wealth of fresh and fantastic interpretations, updating the genre without limiting its scope to orthodoxies
Going back in time
By NICHOLAS SCHROEDER  |  April 06, 2012

Errol Morris's magnificent obsessions

The tops of the side tables in Errol Morris's office are entirely obscured by books, among them Remembering Satan: A Tragic Case of Recovered Memory ; The Education of T.C. Mits: What Modern Mathematics Means to You ; French psychoanalyst Jacques Laca
Mr. Natural
By EUGENIA WILLIAMSON  |  July 15, 2011

The death of Osama bin Laden proves that pragmatic progressivism works

You saw the meme buzzing around the Net on Monday: Barack Obama, in dark sunglasses, smirking: "SORRY IT TOOK SO LONG TO GET YOU A COPY OF MY BIRTH CERTIFICATE," it read, in I Can Has Cheezburger all-caps. "I WAS TOO BUSY KILLING OSAMA BIN LADEN."
Hope at last
By GREG COOK  |  May 06, 2011

Life during wartime

In Fallujah, Marine Captain Rye Barcott got good at separating the two parts of his soul.
NGO big or go home
By S.I. ROSENBAUM  |  April 08, 2011


Review: RISD's '2011 Faculty Biennial' impresses and inspires

The Rhode Island School of Design's "2011 Faculty Biennial" at the RISD Museum (20 North Main Street, Providence, through March 20) features more than 200 teachers for a varied buffet ranging from tangled noodley junk sculpture to sleek architecture des
A visual buffet
By GREG COOK  |  March 04, 2011

B. Dolan goes where few MCs have gone before

B. Dolan is like Joaquin Phoenix with no safety net and a whole lot more back hair. Unlike Phoenix in last year's faux meta-mockumentary I'm Not Here , the Providence native doesn't shock people for no good reason.
The Bombzo Way
By CHRIS FARAONE  |  February 11, 2011

On doctors, psychologists, and torture

Last year, Physicians for Human Rights used government papers to document that CIA doctors and psychologists participated in the conception and monitoring of the agency's infamous torture regime at Guantanamo Bay, Abu Ghraib, and other detention centers
By DAVID SCHARFENBERG  |  January 21, 2011

Review: Aftermath presents Iraq refugees in their own words

Aftermath presents Iraq refugees in their own words
Collateral damage
By CAROLYN CLAY  |  October 29, 2010

Holy Everglades, Batman!

What a shock to see the discovery of an alligator at Sissons Pond in Portsmouth! Based on the photographs, Phillipe and Jorge reckon it has to be the largest reptile ever seen in the Biggest Little outside of the State House.
A 'gator in the biggest little; angry Americans are still angry; a few great women
By PHILLIPE AND JORGE  |  September 03, 2010

Radical night out in Portland

“People are upset about Guantánamo and Abu Ghraib,” Noam Chomsky told 750 people packed into the Woodfords Congregational Church last Saturday night, “but if you’re concerned about human rights, take a walk into a maximum-security prison.”
 Activism Optimism
By LANCE TAPLEY  |  April 30, 2010

Interview: Tamler Sommers

One of the most enjoyable by-products of lit mag the Believer ’s many long, unconventional interviews has been the collection A Very Bad Wizard: Morality Behind the Curtain , by 39-year-old University of Houston philosophy professor Tamler Sommers.
Philosophically speaking
By JON GARELICK  |  March 26, 2010

Seeking humane treatment

Some Maine people are taking moral responsibility for the way supermax inmates are treated.
State and national efforts well under way
By LANCE TAPLEY  |  February 19, 2010

Screams from solitary

The 132-man supermax unit within the 925-man Maine State Prison is an expensive, taxpayer-funded torture chamber that for 18 years has sucked in mostly nonviolent, mostly mentally ill prisoners and ground them up by means of mind-destroying solitary conf
‘By dehumanizing prisoners, we dehumanize ourselves.’
By LANCE TAPLEY  |  February 19, 2010

Ransom Notes

While reporting from Afghanistan two years ago, David Rohde became, for the second time in his career, an unwilling participant rather than an observer. On October 29, 1995, Rohde had been arrested by Bosnian Serbs. And then in November 2008, Rohde and
Was the NY Times being hypocritical when it suppressed coverage of its journalist who was kidnapped by the Taliban?
By ADAM REILLY  |  February 12, 2010

Anti-solitary campaign expands

As the February 17 State House public hearing approaches on the bill to restrict solitary confinement at the Maine State Prison, the National Religious Campaign Against Torture (NRCAT), which sparked national debate about Abu Ghraib and Guantánamo, has a
Stopping Supermax Torture
By LANCE TAPLEY  |  February 05, 2010


In his powerful new memoir, The Ticking Is the Bomb (W.W. Norton), Scituate native Nick Flynn recounts a conversation he had with a man in Turkey.
Obsessed with the wrongs of Abu Ghraib, local author Nick Flynn traveled across the globe to meet its victims
By MIKE MILIARD  |  January 15, 2010

Review: The Men Who Stare at Goats

Here’s a subject that really could have used a Stanley Kubrick or a John Frankenheimer or a Robert Altman. But are there any great cinematic satirists left, auteurs with the knack for black comedy and cold-blooded irony?
Bleating hearts tame Goats
By PETER KEOUGH  |  November 06, 2009

Sarah and the shipmates

Humorist, historian, superhero. Sarah Vowell is a woman of letters and voices.
Vowell on the Puritans and the founding of Rhode Island
By GREG COOK  |  October 23, 2009

Super Sonik

When Cambridge native Caleb Neelon talks about how he got hooked on graffiti, he often recounts a trip he took to Germany with his mom in 1990.  
Graffitist Caleb Neelon is a street survivor
By GREG COOK  |  February 18, 2009


Delivering the world

No other newsroom figure boasts quite the same mix of romantic appeal and nobility of purpose as the foreign correspondent.
Can a Boston start-up reinvent foreign reporting?
By ADAM REILLY  |  December 17, 2008

McCain’s crooked talk on torture

It might surprise some that McCain’s record in opposing torture and the Bush administration’s terror-war approach is more complicated than his comments suggest.
Critics, including a local former army interrogator, say he’s trying to play both sides of the issue
By IAN DONNIS  |  September 17, 2008

Muzzle mania

Giving a Muzzle Award to the Boston Police Department for its handling of Veterans Day protesters is in keeping with widespread media complicity that allows lower ranks to be court-martialed while war criminals in the White House escape accountability fo
Letters to the Boston editor, July 11, 2008

Signs of life

Gone are the days when documentaries were regarded as the scruffy relatives of “real” films.
A full slate of compelling fare at the 11th annual Newport International Film Festival

Photo op?

After 11 days on the road promoting Standard Operating Procedure , his film about the Abu Ghraib prisoner-abuse scandal, Errol Morris is back in his Cambridge office.
In Errol Morris’s Standard Operating Procedure , a picture is worth a thousand words
By PETER KEOUGH  |  May 01, 2008


Bad seeds?

For Errol Morris, film doesn’t show reality, it organizes it in an attempt at arriving at the truth.
Errol Morris checks the apples, not the tree, in Standard Operating Procedure
By PETER KEOUGH  |  April 30, 2008

Making book

This spring brings exciting story collections from established authors and hot newcomers.
Spring Arts Preview: Fiction, non-fiction, and poetry
By BARBARA HOFFERT  |  March 10, 2008

The play’s the thing

A couple of weeks ago at the Oscars, the first Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film to go to an Austrian went to the wrong filmmaker.
 Interview: Michael Haneke on the rules of his Games
By PETER KEOUGH  |  March 04, 2008

Going to Hell

“Abandon all hope, you who enter here” are the words we find inscribed across the gate of Hell at the beginning of the third canto of Inferno.
Bread and Puppet tours Bush's inferno
By GREG COOK  |  January 29, 2008